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Remembering The Tulsa Race Massacre 100 Years Later

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Editor Anneliese Bruner’s grandmother, Florence Mary Parrish Bruner, whose story is retold in the new book "The Nation Must Awake."

MONDAY on "The Source" — 100 years ago today, a white mob attacked the Black community in the Greenwood District of Tulsa, Oklahoma — a horrific event known as the Tulsa Race Massacre.

Hundreds of people were killed and thousands were left homeless, as the mob used military weapons and airplanes to drop sticks of dynamite on homes and businesses.

Despite the horrific nature of the massacre, which is now recognized as one of the worst incidents of racial violence in U.S. history, the event was almost forgotten about.

News reports were largely squelched, documentation disappeared, and attempts to teach about it were suppressed, but one survivor’s account of that tragic day remains and is now published in “The Nation Must Awake: My Witness To the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921.”

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"The Source" is a live call-in program airing Mondays through Thursdays from 12-1 p.m. Leave a message before the program at (210) 615-8982. During the live show, call 833-877-8255, email thesource@tpr.org or tweet @TPRSource.

*This interview will air on Monday, May 31.