Texas Public Radio

Democratic Candidates Embrace The Risk Of Radical Ideas

Democratic presidential hopefuls are betting on bold. The majority of the Democrats running for president want to create a national health insurance program. Several want to do away with private health insurance entirely. Candidates are engaging on questions about reparations for slavery, and most of the White House hopefuls have endorsed the goal of a carbon-neutral economy within the next decade. Increase the size of the U.S. Supreme Court? Several candidates are now on board. Massachusetts...

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Can Woodstock 50 'Recreate The Magic' Of The Original Festival?

It's been 50 years since Woodstock Music & Arts Festival. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of three days of peace, love and music, Woodstock 50 will take place this Aug. 16–18, 2019 in Watkins Glen, N.Y. Festival co-founder Michael Lang has announced the official lineup for the anniversary festival with Jay-Z , Dead & Company and The Killers as headliners. Rounding out the list of performers are Miley Cyrus, Imagine Dragons, The Black Keys and Chance The Rapper as well as acts like Santana...

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The political and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela has led many Venezuelans to seek safe haven in the U.S. and Mexico. While the Trump administration is strongly pushing for a change of government in Venezuela, Mexico has decided to stay neutral.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gazeronly/14353667207

Thursday at noon on "The Source" — Sixty-four percent of Texans support laws protecting gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination, according to the Public Religion Research Institute.

Yet a new report from Equality Texas details the many obstacles that still remain for nearly 1 million LGBTQ+ individuals living in Texas. What can policy do to change the future of equality in the state?

From Texas Standard:

Tuesday, after five years of legal wrangling, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 5-4 decision in a challenge to rules allowing the federal government to detain immigrants with criminal convictions, even if they entered the U.S. lawfully, and even after they have served their time. The decision prevents such an immigrant from appealing a detention decision, and could allow indefinite detention.

From Texas Standard:

The U.S. population is aging, and many older adults have, or will have, some form of dementia. Right now, the health care workforce is not prepared to meet their needs, says sociologist Christopher Johnson. But Johnson is particularly poised to help fix the problem, as professor at the country's first master's of science program in dementia and aging studies, at Texas State University in San Marcos.

The hashtag #AbledsAreWeird started with a childhood memory that occurred to writer and disability rights activist Imani Barbarin: She was in her community swimming pool when a man threw her crutch into the pool to "help her swim." Naturally, the crutch sank, and she had to fetch it from under water.

Democratic presidential hopefuls are betting on bold.

The majority of the Democrats running for president want to create a national health insurance program. Several want to do away with private health insurance entirely. Candidates are engaging on questions about reparations for slavery, and most of the White House hopefuls have endorsed the goal of a carbon-neutral economy within the next decade.

Increase the size of the U.S. Supreme Court? Several candidates are now on board.

A group of civil rights and faith leaders are demanding a meeting with FBI Director Christopher Wray in the wake of the New Zealand terror attacks that killed at least 50 people as they prayed in mosques. The killer was a white nationalist who named President Trump as an inspiration in his online racist screed.

The groups want the FBI to address "the threat to public safety" and to their communities "by white nationalist violence."

To avoid what's been dubbed the "benefits cliff," some workers turn down higher-paying jobs because it would disqualify them from public assistance.

FDA Approves First Drug To Treat Postpartum Depression

10 hours ago

For the first time in history, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new treatment for postpartum depression, a mental illness that affects about one in nine mothers after childbirth, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A recent study that questioned the healthfulness of eggs raised a perpetual question: Why do studies, as has been the case with health research involving eggs, so often flip-flop from one answer to another?

The truth isn't changing all the time. But one reason for the fluctuations is that scientists have a hard time handling the uncertainty that's inherent in all studies. There's a new push to address this shortcoming in a widely used – and abused – scientific method.

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The Moth Mainstage Live, April 5

TPR’s participation in this event is made possible in part by Shag the Salon, and Codeup.

Arts & Culture

Top Picks In Classical Music, For March

Mar 14, 2019

Welcome to Major Themes, a monthly feature in which classical music experts recommend a must-hear recording based on what's happening at classical stations and programs around the country. This month, we checked in with friends in Michigan, Tennessee, Vermont and California, and the national program Pipedreams. Here are their picks, with an emphasis on Women's History Month, piano, birthdays and vocal music.

Jakub Józef Orlinski: Anima Sacra (Erato)

Michael Cirlos

A new art installation downtown grew out of some large black and white pictures by Michael Cirlos, extracted from his book Humans of San Antonio. It's in a spot that’s quite accessible but perhaps not in a place the public would normally visit.

In the early 1980s, actor Stephen Tobolowsky was living in Los Angeles with his girlfriend at the time, Beth Henley. Henley was hot off the success of winning a Pulitzer Prize for her play, “Crimes of the Heart.” The play’s success drew the attention of Hollywood, including director Jonathan Demme, who was looking for his next project after “Melvin and Howard.”

Paul Casanova Garcia

The San Antonio Missions are great gateways for visitors to explore the city's Spanish colonial past. But an event at the San Juan Mission on Saturday is a reminder that the real story they offer may be much bigger than we think.

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2019 Texas Legislative Session

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