David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

David Martin Davies

Host, "The Source," "Texas Matters"

David Martin Davies is  a veteran journalist with more than 20 years of experience covering Texas, the border and Mexico. 

Davies is the host of "The Source," an hour-long live call-in news program that airs on KSTX at noon Monday through Thursday. Since 1999 he was been the host and producer of "Texas Matters," a weekly radio news magazine and podcast that looks at the issues, events and people in the Lone Star State. 

Davies' reporting has been featured on National Public Radio, American Public Media's "Marketplace" and the BBC. He has written for The San Antonio Light, The San Antonio Express-News, The Texas Observer and other publications.

His reporting has been recognized with numerous awards. Davies was named the 2008 Texas Radio Journalist of the Year by the Houston Press Club. In 2015, he was recognized with two First Amendment Awards by the Fort Worth Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The Association for Women in Communications San Antonio Professional Chapter honored Davies with the 2015 Edna McGaffey Media Excellence Headliner Award.

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Do you remember learning about Texas history in grade school, and reading one sentence in the text books stating Texas impeached Governor James Ferguson? Then we learned his wife MA Ferguson was elected governor years later — and that’s all we got about this very curious event.

Veronica G. Cardenas for Texas Public Radio

A former U.S. ambassador to Mexico warned that the recent drama over tariffs on Mexican products may not be over. He's worried it may resume in three months.

President Donald Trump's threat to impose tariffs on Mexico was designed to pressure America’s top trading partner into taking action to prevent Central American immigrants from reaching the southern U.S. border.

The tariffs were scheduled to take effect on Monday, June 10. But on the previous Friday, Trump tweeted that Mexican officials “agreed to take strong measures to stem the tide of migration.”

 

Oscar Casares is known for his short story collection, "Brownsville," a publication that has become a new classic about life in this border city. 

The Texas Historical Commission has recognized musician Lydia Mendoza as a significant contributor to Texas history by awarding her an official Texas History Marker.

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio


David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

At an undisclosed time Friday, new warning signs are expected to be posted at Elmendorf Lake Park, alerting the public about a chemical that’s sprayed in the area.

The spraying isn’t new. It’s been happening for more than a year.

Every four minutes at Elmendorf, a machine inside a grey metal box on the side of the lake pumps out a foggy mist that smells like grape Kool-Aid.

It’s called the Bird Buffer, a chemical mixture that is designed to irritate birds.

Pixabay CC0 http://bit.ly/2ECTH0w

The musical genre of Americana can be hard to define. It includes a wide variety of styles and sounds ranging from bluegrass, country, rockabilly and the blues to roots rock, country rock, singer-songwriters, R&B and any of their various combinations. 

How did Americana originate and gain popularity? Whose stories helped shape the sound? How has it evolved over the decades and how do the sounds of Americana continue to shape and influence popular music?

Courtesy

Some politicians paint such a dire picture of the Texas/Mexico border it’s natural to wonder where all this is leading.


Courtesy Greg Brockhouse

 

Thursday at noon on "The Source" — District 6 City Council representative Greg Brockhouse is in a heated runoff for San Antonio Mayor against incumbent Ron Nirenberg. 

Pixabay CC0 http://bit.ly/2HBrnw3

Development and rapid population growth are putting more vulnerable San Antonio neighborhoods increasingly at risk for gentrification. 

  

Signs around the West Side of San Antonio declare "Mi barrio no se vende" ("My neighborhood isn't for sale") but with rising property taxes and perpetual "buy as is" offers, many houses in near downtown neighborhoods are being sold, remodled and flipped. 

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