David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

David Martin Davies

Host, "The Source," "Texas Matters"

David Martin Davies is  a veteran journalist with more than 20 years of experience covering Texas, the border and Mexico. 

Davies is the host of "The Source," an hour-long live call-in news program that airs on KSTX at noon Monday through Thursday. Since 1999 he was been the host and producer of "Texas Matters," a weekly radio news magazine and podcast that looks at the issues, events and people in the Lone Star State. 

Davies' reporting has been featured on National Public Radio, American Public Media's "Marketplace" and the BBC. He has written for The San Antonio Light, The San Antonio Express-News, The Texas Observer and other publications.

His reporting has been recognized with numerous awards. Davies was named the 2008 Texas Radio Journalist of the Year by the Houston Press Club. In 2015, he was recognized with two First Amendment Awards by the Fort Worth Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The Association for Women in Communications San Antonio Professional Chapter honored Davies with the 2015 Edna McGaffey Media Excellence Headliner Award.

Ways to Connect

Courtesey of candidate.

Thursday at noon on "The Source" — District 6 City Council representative Greg Brockhouse is in a heated runoff for San Antonio Mayor against incumbent Ron Nirenberg. 

The two represent very different views and attitudes about most everything related to city government and community priorities, from plans to address climate change and transportation issues to property taxes and a proposed Chick-Fil-A at the San Antonio International Airport.

Pixabay CC0 http://bit.ly/2HBrnw3

Development and rapid population growth are putting more vulnerable San Antonio neighborhoods increasingly at risk for gentrification. 

  

Signs around the West Side of San Antonio declare "Mi barrio no se vende" ("My neighborhood isn't for sale") but with rising property taxes and perpetual "buy as is" offers, many houses in near downtown neighborhoods are being sold, remodled and flipped. 

The scene is a Washington D.C. in turmoil. There’s a "constitutional crisis" with a president who argues the law doesn’t apply to him. He ignores congressional subpoenas and is abusing the power of the executive branch for personal and political gain. If Congress doesn’t rise to the challenge and assert itself as a constitutionally empowered co-equal branch of the government, it could mean the end of "checks and balances" and the dawning 0f the imperial president with virtually unlimited power.

APM Reports

Police officers nationwide use Tasers as a less lethal alternative to guns. The idea is to be able to stop someone – usually an unarmed but violent person – without having to kill them.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

On Monday, State Senator Brandon Creighton rose on the Senate floor to present his bill SB 1663. He is proposing a stringent process for the removal or alteration of historic monuments in Texas.

Sen. Creighton:

Our historical monuments tell the story of Texas. Our history is part of who we are, part of the story of Texas, but history is never just one person's account.

What followed was a four-hour debate on the Senate floor that was passionate and sometimes personal. 

Courtesy Oscar Stewart

Oscar Stewart was following his Saturday routine. He observed the Sabbath at the Chabad of Poway synagogue, where the sound of Torah reading usually gives him solitude and peace.

“And I hear gunshots,” Stewart said. “And having been in Iraq, I know what shots sound like.”

Stewart said his first instinct was to run for safety. He got to the exit door but then something happened.

Flickr/Keith Ivey

When Texans head to the polls on Super Tuesday in 2020, the act of voting could be very different. Texas lawmakers are looking at bills to cut property taxes and boost school spending, and they're also looking at ways to secure elections in the state, particularly with Senate Bill 9. 


David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

When the state of Texas tried to execute Patrick Murphy on March 28, the U.S. Supreme Court stepped in. The high court ruled that the execution was unconstitutional. But it wasn't because of any concerns about due process or the morality of the state taking a life. The issue was religious freedom.

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

Patrick Murphy was ready to die on March 28, and the State of Texas was ready to kill him. It was the U.S. Supreme Court that stepped in and granted the surprise execution stay. That’s why Murphy is alive today.

Pexels CC0 http://bit.ly/2Dwuxjv

When we go through the experience of deep loss after the death of a loved one, it might feel like our brains are being ripped apart. In a way, that is what is happening.

There is a growing body of scientific evidence that shows grief has a physical impact on the brain.

Pages