Cesar Chavez | Texas Public Radio

Cesar Chavez

Courtesy of the United Farm Workers of America

  • Farm workers are deemed essential during the coronavirus pandemic. But many of these critical workers won’t reap the benefits of the $2.2 trillion stimulus package that lawmakers recently passed because of their legal status.

  • Relatives of people in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s custody cope with fears about the possible spread of COVID-19 inside crowded detention centers.


Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

The name of Dolores Huerta is often spoken in the same breath as that of labor rights icon, Cesar Chavez. Huerta looks none of her 89 years. Wearing a bright red blazer and black pants, her diminutive figure was larger than life when she spoke to a sold out breakfast Tuesday for the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.


San Antonio celebrated Labor Day with a downtown march that remembered the 490 mile march that Texas farm workers completed 50 years ago.

The Labor Day procession began at San Fernando Cathedral and ended at downtown’s Milam Park. Hundreds gathered and chanted the same slogans that motivated striking farm workers 50 years ago.

There is no music in this week's episode of Alt.Latino. Instead, we do one of our occasional "deep dives" into a subject to pursue insights and perspectives that help us think about more than music. This time around, the subject is Cesar Chavez, the recent biopic about the civil-rights activist and labor leader and the movement to unionize farm workers.