Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

Norma Martinez

News Anchor

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra, and currently plays with the all-volunteer South Texas Symphonic Orchestra in San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

Texans in border communities used to cross back and forth freely with little to no documentation

Much has changed since the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. The 9/11 Commission in 2004 determined the border crossing rules were too lax, and Congress passed the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, which required U.S. border crossers to possess passports or passport cards to cross the international ports of entry. Mexican travelers are required to carry a Border Crossing Card.

The complexities of international travel can be mind-twisting to someone who is new to it.


Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

In the last week, El Pasoans have written songs, poems and created artwork to commemorate the victims of the Aug. 3 mass shooting. Some of that artwork is the kind you carry through a lifetime.


Chicana historian Yolanda Chavez Leyva sits outside one of the remaining homes in Duranguito, one of El Paso's oldest neighborhoods.
Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

The gunman who killed 22 people in El Paso specifically targeted Latinos in a city that's nearly 80% Hispanic. A deep fear among some El Pasoans has cast a chilling shadow over their defiant shows of strength and unity. For others, the tragedy offers opportunities to elicit bittersweet smiles, express their love for each other and confront this nation's darkest truths.


Courtesy of the Texas General Land Office

Despite being met with opposition, renovation work is underway at the Alamo as the Texas General Land Office plans to restore and recapture the historical 1836 battle.

Karina Erickson, Communications Director with the GLO, said the project aims to elevate the Alamo to the level of the Gettysburg memorial in Pennsylvania.


People protesting President Trump's visit to El Paso.
Mallory Falk | KERA

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump visited El Paso Wednesday afternoon to meet with first responders and survivors of Saturday’s mass shooting.

Those who greeted the president included Gov. Greg Abbott, Sen. John Cornyn, Sen. Ted Cruz and El Paso Mayor Dee Margo.

Residents, however, turned out in force to protest the visit.

The border town of El Paso, TX with Juarez, Mexico in the background south of the Rio Grande River.
Ron Reiring | Flickr / https://flic.kr/p/U6B7QD

The death toll from the El Paso shooting rose to 22 on Monday. The tragedy has deeply resonated with people throughout the nation, including TPR Morning Edition host Norma Martinez. She is from El Paso, and she offers these personal reflections on her community.


Vanessa Velazquez

The Texas Historical Commission designated the Alamo a “Historic Texas Cemetery” in 2019, but local indigenous peoples and descendants of early settlers want to go a step further with an “unverified cemetery” designation

Ramón Juan Vásquez, executive director of the American Indians in Texas, said members of the Coahuiltecan Nation and descendents of early settlers have fought for recognition of the cemetery for 24 years.

Luis M. Garza

Latino arts and culture is rich, colorful and varied. The National Association of Latino Arts and Culture is dedicated to promoting, developing and cultivating Latinx artists. Sometimes, however, outside forces can take a toll on their community.

Maria López De León, president and CEO of NALAC, said the organization has not been shy around the country’s immigration debate.


Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Chicana writer Cherríe Moraga is the author of the literary memoir, “Native Country of the Heart.” It explores not just Moraga’s life, but that of her mother, Elvira.  Elvira was born in 1914. Her father hired 11-year-old Elvira and her siblings as cotton pickers in California. As a young teen, she worked at a Tijuana casino that was frequented by Hollywood stars and mob bosses.

Daniella Rossell

One of the leading voices in Latino literature centers her latest work on her close relationship with her mother. Cherríe Moraga aims to preserve her mother’s stories and memories in her literary memoir, Native Country of the Heart.


Pages