© 2022 Texas Public Radio
Real. Reliable. Texas Public Radio.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Congress considers legislation to reform prescription drug pricing

Ways To Subscribe
Increased use of generic drugs caused a slight drop in the price of prescription drugs in 2012.
iStockphoto.com
Increased use of generic drugs caused a slight drop in the price of prescription drugs in 2012.

The U.S. already spends more on prescription drugs than other countries and drug costs are expected to increase faster than other areas of health-related spending over the next decade.

Prescription drug reforms in the Biden administration’s Build Back Better Act aim to alleviate these rising costs. What proposals are lawmakers considering and what is their likelihood of passage?

PBS reports that starting in 2024, the bill would cap seniors’ annual out of pocket costs at $2,000. Insulin prices paid out of pocket would be capped at $35 for a 30-day supply starting in 2023.

How does drug pricing work now? What impact do prescription costs have on overall consumer health costs and outcomes? What about patients who don’t have health insurance?

What are the pros and cons of price caps and other proposed reforms? How would they affect insurance markets and pharmaceutical innovation? What other factors and potential implications should be considered?

What rules and regulations are currently in place or could be imposed to ensure all Americans can afford the medications they need?

Guests:

"The Source" is a live call-in program airing Mondays through Thursdays from 12-1 p.m. Leave a message before the program at (210) 615-8982. During the live show, call 833-877-8255, email thesource@tpr.org or tweet @TPRSource.

*This interview was recorded on Thursday, Demember 2.

Stay Connected