Texas Matters | Texas Public Radio

Texas Matters

Fridays at 12:30 p.m. & Sundays at 9:30 p.m.

Texas is a big state with a growing, diverse population and as the population grows, the issues and challenges facing its residents multiply. "Texas Matters" is a statewide news program that spends half an hour each week looking at the issues and culture of Texas.

"Texas Matters" is hosted by David Martin Davies, who talks with policymakers and newsmakers to help shed light on issues often overlooked by other media outlets.

David Martin Davies:

Davies is the host of "The Source" and a veteran journalist with more than 25 years of experience covering Texas, the border and Mexico. He is a regular contributor to NPR and American Public Media's "Marketplace." Davies' work has appeared in "The San Antonio Express-News," "The Texas Observer" and other print publications, as well as KLRN public television’s interview program "Conversations."

Texas Matters is made possible by the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures.

Ways to Connect

The next time Texans vote in a stateside election will be Super Tuesday, on March 3, 2020. Ten states are expected to hold their primaries and caucuses on Super Tuesday, including three big ones: Texas, California and Virginia. There will be a lot on the line for the national and local primary races in Texas, and voting could look very different on that day ... if Senate Bill 9 is passed.

Austin is one of the fastest growing cities in the nation. Tech giants like Google and Amazon continue to expand there.  It’s hard to say what’s rising faster the rents or the commute times.

However one could say Austin is a victim of its own success.  But other cities would love to have some of that Austin success come their way.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, an estimated 5.7 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer's.

This number includes an estimated 5.5 million people age 65 and older and approximately 200,000 individuals under age 65 who have early-onset Alzheimer's. One in 10 people age 65 and older has Alzheimer's dementia.

As the number of older Americans grows rapidly, so too will the number of new and existing cases of Alzheimer’s.

There appears to be another surge at the southern border, and the most recent reports of number of families looking to gain unauthorized entry into the United States are raising eyebrows. They've certainly inspired a novelist in his latest work.

More than 76,000 migrants crossed the border without authorization in February. That's an 11-year high.

Kevin K. McAlleenan is the commissioner of Customs and Border Protection.

Valeria Luiselli’s 2017 book “Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions”  is an accounting of the author’s time working as an immigration courtroom interpreter in New York City.  Like many of us, she was preoccupied with the border surge that occurred in 2014 and perplexed at the plight of the unaccompanied children, some 80,000, who made the perilous journey from the violence and despair of their home countries in Central America.  

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