Arts & Culture | Texas Public Radio

Arts & Culture

Arts and culture news, criticism, and programming from TPR/NPR.

Disney Enterprises, Inc.

There are moments in the new photorealistic version of “The Lion King” that look so lifelike, you’d swear it was filmed on location. The film takes place in an Africa of your dreams, an unspoiled savannah with picturesque rock formations, deep gorges, and flowing, tall grass. The animators can be proud of these Pride Lands. But there’s a curious lifelessness to many of the characters, which led me to ultimately prefer the original hand-drawn “Lion King” to this new version, as much as I admired its technical wizardry.

Harry Gamboa Jr.

Inner demons, passions and life transformations are all recurring themes of one of the most iconic artists from the Chicano street art movement. Carlos Almaraz was one of Los Angeles’ leading contemporary artists, but his life was cut short when he died of complications from AIDS in 1989.

Elsa Flores Almaraz is working to keep her late husband’s work and legacy alive. The new documentary, “Carlos Almaraz: Playing with Fire,” highlights the significant moments in Carlos’ life and how these memories transcend in his artwork. 

Courtesy Julian Cordero, San Antonio Metropolitan Ballet

Watch "Hansel and Gretel" interpreted for ballet. Celebrate Dia De Los Muertos with music and altars. And watch a Russian chamber orchestra at San Fernando Cathedral.

Janis Joplin: More Than Just A Great Big Voice

Oct 22, 2019

From Texas Standard:

Janis Joplin left her Texas home in the early 1960s. She didn't fit in in Port Arthur, where she grew up, and she wanted to make a name for herself as a musician. She did that, and more, becoming the biggest female rock star of the era. Joplin's greatest musical success, the album, "Pearl," was released after her death from a heroin overdose in 1970. She was just 27. 

A model of Picasso's stage design for the ballet Pulcinella inside the larger physical recreation of the same design.
Dominic Anthony Walsh for Texas Public Radio

The McNay Art Museum’s new exhibit, "Picasso to Hockney: Modern Art on Stage," explores all mediums of theatre art, from set design to music composition to on-stage performance. The extensive collection of late San Antonio arts philanthropist Robert Tobin made the exhibition possible. 

Fabian+Echevarria

Pursuing a comedy career comes with challenges all its own, but as an openly gay entertainer in the 1980s, Marga Gomez had an additional set of hurdles to overcome. “Latin Standards” is Gomez’s 12th solo show.

Plus, San Antonio’s American Indians bring attention to the recent discovery of human remains on the property of the Alamo.

Courtesy Sam Kindrick

Spot Barnett, a saxophone player who became a San Antonio musical legend, died last week.


Natalia Sun

Get a new perspective on chamber music. Tour the city's newest art museum. And then take a musical tour of Britain. Your weekend is here. 

First off tomorrow night, violist Marisa Bushman says Agarita wants you to listen to chamber music with new ears.

"We're trying to break down the barriers of what people perceive classical music to be. Come see a concert. Immerse yourself in an Agarita and friends performance," she said.

Josh Huskin

Were the Jurassic Park raptors just misunderstood? Who’s in the Regina George circle of friends? When did Michael B. Jordan break your heart into the most pieces?

It’s unlikely these are common afterthoughts to some of the most well-known films in mainstream media. But these questions and 27 others are answered and illustrated in Movies (and Other Things), the latest book from San Antonio native and author Shea Serrano.


Michael Quintanilla speaks on stage.
Elena Souris

Michael Quintanilla, a former newspaper reporter and fashion writer, has for several years contributed special videos to the annual Gridiron charity event. The videos show usually serious government officials dancing with him to popular songs. This year, Quintanilla took a break from Gridiron. But he knew how popular the videos have become, and he made sure the tradition continued.


Pages