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Rik Keller

In a pre-interview exchange of text messages between Classics a la Carte host James Baker and pianist Lara Downes, Lara asked: “Do you have my new recording of spirituals and freedom songs?” Later, in the interview, Baker spoke to Downes about the spirituals and freedom songs contained in the album “Some of These Days.” The conversation began with one of the oldest of Black spirituals, “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child.”

Rik Keller

Lara Downes describes these times as the "lost season," referring to the blanket cancellations of concert engagements practically every performing artist in the world is now suffering. She may be sidelined, but she is not silenced, musically or on any number of other topics related to music and its power to contribute to our conversations of race, injustice, and Covid-19. James Baker, host of KPAC's Classics a la Carte, recently talked to Lara about her background, her activist roots and making music in a time of pandemic.

Oscar Moreno

Middle and high school students from across the KPAC listening area brought their talents to McAllister Auditorium on January 25, 2020 for the sixth annual SOUNDS LIKE KPAC competition, featuring solo and ensemble performances, plus a juried art show, and written word entries for everyone in attendance to read, all inspired by the classical music heard on Texas Public Radio’s KPAC 88.3 FM.

Suzanne Pack

As part of KPAC’s 35th anniversary celebration, this week’s “Performance Saturday” features two piano recitals that were produced in honor of the milestone.

The first half of the program was recorded on March 25, 2018 at the home of Jeffrey Glass, MD, who hosted an intimate gathering of the “Class of 1982.” These classical music fans and donors were instrumental in the early success of KPAC (then at 90.9 FM) by giving of their time and talent, enabling the organization to grow and eventually merge with San Antonio Community Radio to create Texas Public Radio.

Public domain

Ragtime was an American musical style which enjoyed popularity between 1895 and 1918. It had its origins in African-American circles, bringing fame and publishing contracts to many Black American composers of the era.

In November, 1970, pianist Joshua Rifkin released the first of three recordings of rags for the Nonesuch label. "Scott Joplin: Piano Rags" went on to become Nonesuch's first million-selling release, marking the beginning of a ragtime revival.

 

KPAC Celebrates 35 Years

Nov 3, 2017

On November 7, 1982, classical station KPAC began broadcasting at 90.9 FM. The first piece played on the air was Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Brandenburg Concerto No. 3.” Later in the 1980s, the merger of the Classical Broadcasting Society and San Antonio Community Radio led to KSTX 89.1 FM, and the creation of Texas Public Radio. Five more stations followed, bringing NPR programming and music to listeners all over central Texas. Today, more than 80,000 people tune in to KPAC 88.3 each week to enjoy the greatest music of all time.

Greg Gorman / Los Angeles Grand Opera

UPDATE (10/16/17): Placido Domingo's concert at the Alamodome has been postponed until further notice. The promoters and venue are working on an alternate date for his appearance in San Antonio.  

Gift of Robert L. B. Tobin / McNay Art Museum

KPAC's "The Art of American Popular Song" approaches the end of the line (for the series, not popular song!) with this celebration of great craftsmen. Vernon Duke, Arthur Schwartz, Harry Warren, Kay Swift, Hoagy Carmichael, Vincent Youmans, and Kurt Weill are featured alongside Hugh Martin, who at the time of the original production was the only of the songwriting legends of the first half of the twentieth century still alive.

Sam Arlen

The KPAC series of more than a decade ago, "The Art of American Popular Song," followed a blueprint laid out by the composer and writer Alec Wilder.

Biography.com

Unlike Jerome Kern and Harold Arlen, who wrote their songs with numerous collaborative lyricists, and not at all like Irving Berlin and Cole Porter, who preferred doing it all themselves, writing both the music and the words, Richard Rodgers was most comfortable, and most successful, when in partnership with another. Over the course of his long and storied career in musical theater and beyond, Rodgers enjoyed two important partnerships.

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