Classical Connections | Texas Public Radio

Classical Connections

Weekdays, 1 - 3 p.m. on KPAC 88.3 FM

There’s so much great music going on in San Antonio, and the whole area. It’s an exciting time to be a classical music lover around here.

Every weekday afternoon, you can find out more about it. Classical Connections brings you the best classical music from around town, around the state, and around the world. Great performances from music’s biggest names — and great performances you can only hear on Texas Public Radio.

You’ll hear exclusive recordings our TPR engineers have made at concerts and events in the area. You’ll hear directors and artists who drop in to the studio to talk about coming events. You’ll even hear performers playing live on the air right then and there. 

Tune in to KPAC 88.3 FM, or at tpr.org, and meet us in classical music’s most exciting new space. 

Classical Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Russell Hill Rogers Fund for the Arts.

Ways to Connect

Nathan Cone / TPR

When the San Antonio-based Agarita ensemble performed at the Tobin Center in mid-June, it marked the first time live music was performed before an assembled audience in South Texas since the coronavirus pandemic shut down music venues in mid-March. In June, cases of COVID-19 were just beginning to spike in San Antonio.

Courtesy photo

When orchestras went silent around the country in March, guest artists and soloists who had been scheduled to appear with ensembles like our own San Antonio Symphony found themselves with time and talent to offer, but few outlets. The canceled concerts also meant a loss of income for these musicians, many of whom aren’t part of larger ensembles that could apply for government assistance through the Paycheck Protection Program.

Courtesy photo

Round Two of The Gurwitz 2020 International Piano Competition began on Wednesday morning at Ruth Taylor Recital Hall on the Trinity University campus. Six competitors were chosen on Tuesday night to continue performing. They were:

Nathan Cone / TPR

On the second morning of competition at The Gurwitz International Piano Competition, judges and spectators were treated to the artistry of three talented musicians, two of whom brought the audience to their feet.

Nathan Cone / TPR

Twelve pianists of monstrous talent have converged on San Antonio this week for The Gurwitz 2020, the San Antonio International Piano Competition that is now under the aegis of Musical Bridges Around the World. From Russia, Italy, South Korea, Ukraine, China and Canada they come, seeking the Gold Medal, and with it a $25,000 award. The Silver Medalist wins $15,000 and the Bronze Medalist will win $10,000.

Nathan Cone / TPR

Holiday favorites and high spirits are on the bill this weekend as the U.S. Air Force Band of the West presents their annual “Holiday in Blue” concert at Edgewood Theatre of the Performing Arts. This free event is open to the public, and features the 62-piece military band and their many splinter groups (jazz band, wind ensembles), performing favorite melodies for Christmas, Hanukkah, and more.

Nathan Cone / TPR

“What’s so great about seeing the YOSA [Youth Orchestras of San Antonio] Philharmonic is you have these young musicians who bring a level of energy and engagement to what they do that will blow you away,” says Troy Peters, YOSA Music Director.

Tenor David Portillo took his talent from Holmes High School on San Antonio’s west side all the way to the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. Now, he’s coming back to town with YouthCUE, a nationwide effort to positively impact kids through the power of choral music.

Anlo Sepulveda

Pianist and composer Justin Sherburn has enjoyed a long career as a touring musician with Austin bands like 8 ½ Souvenirs and Okkervil River, but now finds himself in front of the big screen with his ensemble Montopolis, performing original soundtracks to silent classics, and now creating a series of multimedia productions highlighting the natural wonders of the Lone Star State.

Jack Morgan | Texas Public Radio

Matthew Dunne is a music professor at UTSA, and after 27 years he plans to retire this summer. He has scheduled one last recital with past and present students this weekend.  

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