Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

Norma Martinez

News Anchor

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra, and currently plays with the all-volunteer South Texas Symphonic Orchestra in San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

Daniella Rossell

One of the leading voices in Latino literature centers her latest work on her close relationship with her mother. Cherríe Moraga aims to preserve her mother’s stories and memories in her literary memoir, Native Country of the Heart.


Verónica G. Cárdenas

The U.S.-Mexico border recently dominated news headlines, from reports on overcrowded detention facilities to the “Stay in Mexico” policy. Two journalists say the region is more complex and culturally rich than what is portrayed in mainstream media

Then, young people living in San Antonio public housing get an education in art and culture in a printmaking summer workforce session.

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

Students from underprivileged backgrounds don’t often get to spread their artistic wings in the classroom. There’s a studio in San Antonio’s Westside that’s actually paying young people “to make art all day.”


Courtesy of Dept. of Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA

Thousands of asylum seekers arrive at the United States southern border, and an administration deems them as a threat to the country. This is not a depiction of our nation’s current immigration climate, but one from nearly four decades ago.

One Catholic priest defied the Reagan administration and the power of the Catholic Church to step up and support Central American refugees.

Courtesy of Sarah Ball

History is a rich, complicated topic that expands beyond textbooks. One Northwest Vista College professor is showing her students a different narrative to American history, allowing them to reflect on racism, oppression and empowerment.

Then, a San Antonio native, and a descendant of one of the founding families of the Alamo City, aims to preserve, maintain and share her family’s heritage dating back centuries. 

Courtesy of Texas Tech University Press

Tex-Mex cuisine has a special place in the hearts of Texans, but some may argue it’s not authentic food. Adán Medrano explores the ingredients and cooking techniques brought to the region centuries ago by the indigenous people and what defines ‘Texas Mexican’ cooking.

Adán Medrano, courtesy of Texas Tech University Press

San Antonio native and chef Adán Medrano is author of “Don’t Count the Tortillas: The Art of Texas Mexican Cooking” (June 25, 2019, Texas Tech University Press).

The recipes in his book draw on authentic Mexican ingredients that make an emotional connection with him. It’s what he calls Texas Mexican cuisine.

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

Now that an ethnic studies course in Mexican American studies has been approved in Texas public schools, some district officials may wonder about the next steps to take.

One San Antonio academy already immerses its students in language and culture. It just wrapped up a two-week camp that expands on that tradition for more than 100 middle and high school kids.

 


Esperanza Peace & Justice Center

Poor communities that have a rich cultural history often battle developers and city officials who may want to demolish structures to make way for improved public housing, parking lots or apartment buildings.

Sarah Zenaida Gould, co-chair of Latinos in Heritage Conservation, said good intentions aside, it’s not what’s best for the community.


Esperanza Peace & Justice Center

Historic preservation is defined as the conservation of buildings, landscapes or other artifacts with historical significance, but structures with cultural significance continue to be demolished in communities across the U.S.

Social justice in historic preservation is now gaining traction and there are more efforts to protect areas that have long been rooted in a community’s history.


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