American History | Texas Public Radio

American History

*This post was updated on Thursday, July 9, at 4:19 p.m.

The past few weeks of Black Lives Matter and anti-racism protests have raised questions about the white supremacist origins of English words and phrases in everyday English vocabulary such as "master bedroom" and "black magic."


America’s origin story is often depicted as an optimistic struggle toward equality with citizens who will one day be united by culture and identity. In reality, the tale of America is nuanced; a history full of internal conflict and forgotten narratives.


Emily Bautista and Anthony Festa in Miss Saigon.
Matthew Murphy

Take a spooky tour of San Antonio's past. Sit back and let a Broadway show transport you to wartime Vietnam. And rediscover David Bowie's take on music and fashion.  


Ellen Schulz with her camera.
The Witte Museum

This fall marks 93 years since the Witte Museum first opened. San Antonio’s sprawling natural history museum has seen several iterations and huge growth, but largely lost in its evolution is the woman whose sheer determination created it.   


From Texas Standard:

The American West isn’t a fixed idea; its scope and definition can change depending on whom you ask. So how does Texas fit into it? University of Texas historian H. W. Brands tries to answer that question and more in his new book, “Dreams of El Dorado: A History of the American West.” In it, he invites readers to rethink the West, how Texas fits into it, and what the West meant to Americans in the past and what it means to them today. 

Raul Luna CC0: http://bit.ly/2XolAVo

Throughout the history of U.S. politics, music has been used as a rallying cry, a unifying message and most potently, a call-to-arms for voters. Essentially, presidential campaign songs are the commercial jingles for the most important product being sold to the American public.

Texans, it turns out, don't know their U.S. history. A new study from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation found 63 percent of respondents in Texas failed a quiz based on questions from the U.S. citizenship examination.

From Texas Standard:

Like media outlets all over the country, Texas Standard is working on its "Year in Review" show in the remaining weeks of 2018. But these final days of the year are also a last chance to reflect on what was happening in the country 50 years ago. 1968 was a tumultuous year and a turning point in American history, and the University of Texas at Austin's Dolph Briscoe Center for American History has an exhibit that takes a deep dive into it.

From Texas Standard:

In this age of Twitter-driven, toxic politics, it's an interesting intellectual exercise to try and imagine how historians might someday look back on the current era in American history. To call it turbulent seems almost to be an understatement. But history itself may help us understand the times we're living in.

Harvard University Press

Since when did rock 'n' roll become "white"? 

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