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opioid

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The Bexar County Opioid Implementation Task Force will begin drafting plans today to implement the state's first needle exchange program as part of a multifaceted effort to address the ongoing opioid crisis. 


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Bexar County will have its day in court against several dozen opioid manufacturers next year according to county officials.

 


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Pregnant women and mothers recovering from opioid addiction now have a home in San Antonio where they can live with their children during rehabilitation. 


Courtesy of the San Antonio Substance Use Symposium

As opioid addiction continues to ravage the nation, healthcare providers and community members are coming together to advocate for a variety of evidence-based methods that aim to alleviate the ongoing crisis.


Courtesy NOVA

Drugs overdoses are now the leading cause of death for people under the age of 50 in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio-Bexar County Joint Opioid Task Force wants San Antonio police officers trained on how to administer medication to someone who has overdosed on opioids.


The explosion of deaths related to opioid misuse has underscored a pressing need for better ways of treating pain, especially chronic pain.

Duquesne University pharmacology associate professor Jelena Janjic thinks she's on to one. It involves using a patient's own immune system to deliver non-opioid pain medication to places in the body where there's pain.

It's been a decade since the financial crisis drove up the unemployment rate in the U.S. and forced people in the prime of their careers to give up looking for work.

Even today, as employers add jobs at a furious pace, the workforce participation rate still hasn't recovered. And now researchers think they know one reason why: the opioid crisis.

Though Americans spend an estimated $80 billion to $100 billion each year in hopes of easing their aching backs, the evidence is mounting that many pricey standard treatments — including surgery and spinal injections — are often ineffective and can even worsen and prolong the problem.

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Bexar County is working to be the first in Texas to legalize a needle exchange program. 


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