Music | Texas Public Radio

Music

Ron Wilkins got his big break about four decades ago, playing with trumpeter Clark Terry.
Courtesy Ron Wilkins

Ron Wilkins, a beloved educator and musician from San Antonio, recently woke up from a month-long, medically induced coma in a COVID-19 ward. Over the weekend, he picked up his trombone for the first time since leaving Northeast Baptist hospital.

Every Granite Hands song starts in the home studio of multi-instrumentalist Sorush Ranjbar.
Dominic Anthony Walsh | Texas Public Radio

The band Granite Hands has members scattered across Texas, from Laredo to San Antonio and Austin to Houston and Denton. The group just released an EP they’re calling Void. It explores a variety of topics that are as wide-ranging as the geographical separation of the band’s members.


Igor Ovsyannykov on Pixabay CC0: http://bit.ly/2C1l8iH

The City's Department of Arts and Culture and the San Antonio Arts Commission are seeking feedback on a draft plan focused on enhancing and promoting performing arts. What needs and opportunities exist when it comes to this sector of the creative community?


Courtesy Sam Kindrick

Spot Barnett, a saxophone player who became a San Antonio musical legend, died last week.


Courtesy James Cullum

Longtime San Antonio cornetist and jazz band leader Jim Cullum, Jr. died on Sunday from an apparent heart attack. He was 77.


Photo courtesy of Dan Johnson

Texas singer-songwriter Dan Johnson doesn’t flinch when asked about veteran suicide. He’s lived it, written songs about it and is now on an open-ended quest to lessen it.

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Los Nahuatlatos (nä wät lâ tōs) is a group with deep roots to their Xicano-Indigenous heritage, whose mission is to “create original, inspiring and innovative music on a conscious level that people of all ages and backgrounds can enjoy.” They describe their sound as “Xicano roots fusion,” because their music is a combination of different traditional Latino styles.

 

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Demitasse is a two-piece softly sung acoustic group comprised of Erik Sanden and Joe Reyes, both from the art-rock band Buttercup. Equipped with high falsetto harmonies and acoustic driven melodies, the duo sounds like the happier version of Elliott Smith or the heartbroken version of The Beach Boys.


Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

San Antonio’s music industry generates an estimated $930 million in economic impact, according to a city study that came out last year.

UTSA professor Stan Renard saw that report, which drew data from music venues, bars, music education organizations and nonprofits, and said something was missing.

The song “Life in the West” became popular in the 1840s. The lyrics, written by American poet George Pope Morris, evoke the call of the fertile promised land and celebrates the freedom of living so close to nature. 

On this episode of Texas Matters, we'll discuss popular songs of the American West with Peabody-winning music scholar  Michael Lasser.


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