migration | Texas Public Radio

migration

A new report by Physicians for Human Rights documents evidence of lasting psychological harm for migrant children and parents subjected to the Trump Administration's family separation policy, which was intended to dissuade migration to the nation's southern border.


Lauren Markham is a writer and reporter based in Berkeley, Calif. Her work has been featured on multiple outlets, including The Guardian, Harper’s, Orion, Guernica, VICE, Pacific Standard, The New Yorker.com and VQR, where she is a contributing editor.
Ben Guccciardi

Senior White House adviser Stephen Miller was recently exposed of sending emails to the far-right media outlet, Breibart, in which he recommended the website write about the 1973 French novel, “The Camp of the Saints.” The controversial novel pushes the theory that minorities are replacing and ultimately destroying white civilization — “the great replacement” myth.

These are the same myths writer and journalist Lauren Markham has aimed to tackle throughout her writing. She has worked with refugees and immigrants for over a decade and has written about migration stories and migration myths.


A young girl at a migrant shelter in Nuevo Laredo.
Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Monday on "The Source" -- Who are the people coming to the U.S. for asylum? What drives them to leave their homes and what are they finding when they arrive at the Southern border?


From Texas Standard:

In Los Angeles minimum wage doesn’t go very far. It’s hard to find an apartment for less than a thousand bucks – over half your monthly pay at that income level. Groceries, utilities, transportation and insurance eat up what’s left of your budget.

Source: United States Census Bureau

Texas continues to attract new residents from across the country and elsewhere. New data from the U.S. Census Bureau supports projections that the state’s population will double by the year 2050.

The study reflects population growth between the years 2010 and 2014. Over that time, the population of Texas grew by 1.8 million people or by 7 percent. Suburban growth outpaced that of major metropolitan areas.

In fact, the in-fill between Austin and San Antonio is an area that some are calling the “new DFW” — with consistent year-over-year growth in corridor towns like New Braunfels and San Marcos, which was ranked nationally as the fastest-growing city in the nation for the third year in a row.

LOS ANGELES — Researchers say a rising percentage of Hispanics in the United States speak proficient English and the share of those speaking Spanish at home has been declining.

A Pew Research Center report released Tuesday says 68 percent of Hispanics spoke only English or spoke English very well in 2013, up from 59 percent in 2000.

The report says the share of Hispanics who speak Spanish at home dropped to 73 percent from 78 percent over the same period.

The shift comes as migration to the United States from Latin America has slowed.