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 Anti-fracking activists took their concerns to the voters of Denton, Texas in the recent November general election and passed a city fracking ban. It went into effect on December first. But industry leaders and the Texas Rail Road Commission say that doesn’t matter. They say it’s still “drill baby drill” for Denton. The Texas Oil and Gas Association and the Texas General Land Commission are now suing Denton over the frack ban. Cathy McMullan is the president of Frack Free Denton.  

David Martin Davies

A new report released this week adds to the growing evidence that the chemicals associated with fracking and horizontal drilling could be a danger to reproductive health to animals and humans. The study was conducted by the Center for Environmental Health.  Susan C.

David Martin Davies

Sometime in November the one billionth barrel of oil was pumped out of the Eagle Ford Shale play – that’s according to the research firm Wood Mackenzie.

More than 70 percent of that production has occurred in the last two years.

The milestone comes at a time when oil prices are going through a steep drop. Right now a barrel of U.S. crude is going for under 70 dollars a barrel. And many in the industry have discussed plans to pull back on U.S. shale production.

The Travis County court system has agreed to hear a case filed against the City of Denton’s fracking ban, advocates of the ban say the state’s “home-rule” statute allows their city to pass these ordinances while state officials argue that cities have no legal authority to ban fracking.

Residents of Denton, Texas, voted Tuesday to ban hydraulic fracturing in the city.

According to unofficial results posted on the city's website, 58.64 percent of voters supported banning the controversial drilling method that is also called fracking; 41.36 percent voted against the proposition. It's the first time a city in the energy-friendly state has voted to ban fracking.

The vote is expected to be challenged, but Mayor Chris Watts said he would defend the ban.

Oil prices are down than more than 25 percent since June and are staying low for now. Drivers may appreciate that, but for oil companies, it's making some of the most controversial methods of producing oil less profitable — and in a few cases, unprofitable.

Next year, Mexico will open its energy sector to foreign investors for the first time in more than 75 years.

Companies based in neighboring Texas stand to make a fortune by unlocking oil and gas trapped in Mexican shale plays, by means of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking.”

Getting at those hidden riches though could prove not just expensive, but dangerous. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Andrew Schneider of Houston Public Media reports.

Communities in Colorado have been engaged in a political fight with the state to get more local control over oil and gas drilling.

It's a battle many thought was heading to the ballot box this November, until a last minute compromise stopped the initiative in its tracks.

Colorado’s governor John Hickenlooper declared the compromise a victory, but that left some members of the state’s environmental community furious and vowing payback on election day.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

At a recent Monday night in Nordheim, a town of 300 about 75 miles southeast of San Antonio, neighbors are gathering at the old dance hall; the Nordheim Shooting Club.

But this isn’t for a night of boot scootin’, they are here to organize against what they see as an environmental threat to their town and their way of life.

Two massive fracking waste disposal pits, one 200 acre site and the other 575 acres, are being proposed for right outside of town.

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