Border Wall | Texas Public Radio

Border Wall

From Texas Standard.

You can squeeze a lot into a spending proposal that’s 2,200 pages long and $1.3 trillion deep. But if you look at the fine print in the spending deal passed by Congress and signed by the president late Friday, you may notice something big in there when it comes to Texas – $1.6 billion in new border security infrastructure.

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

It's a windy morning at the Bandera Gun Club and its sprawling grass fields dotted with shooting stations on the outskirts of the tiny Texas town.

Gunshots echo along the rolling hills as more than 20 groups of men prepare their booths of technological wares for the security minded. F-350s sit with massive mast-like poles sprouting from their beds. A temporary structure holds banks of computer monitors that stream video from the 80-foot trailer-mounted tower outside.

"Can an individual border agent on the ground get this image?" Congressman Will Hurd, R-Texas, asked.

 

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DANIEL SALINAS / LAS CRUCES HIGH SCHOOL

On this episode of Texas Matters:

  • Cash bail in Texas is called unconstitutional (:52)
  • Charges of corruption in construction of the border fence (7: 00)
  • DACA recipients oppose deal on border wall (15:38)
  • Border Colonia residents live in extreme poverty (20:46)


From Texas Standard:

Many folks will be watching the State of the Union to hear what President Trump might say about immigration. The latest White House proposal has two key numbers – 1.8 million is how many so-called Dreamers could be put on a path to citizenship, and 25 billion is how much funding the Trump Administration wants for border security, including building a wall.

The Bargaining Chip At The Border

Jan 29, 2018

With guest host John Donvan.

It seems President Trump has every intention to make good on his campaign promise to build a wall along the nation’s southern border. And it seems he’s ready to make a deal to do it.

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals act face a painful decision: Support President Donald Trump’s offer of an immigration deal and agree to fund the building of a border wall. 

But some young undocumented immigrants in South Texas say they won’t support the border wall even if it means they gain a pathway to citizenship.


Martin do Nascimento / KUT

A San Antonio congressman said he has a bipartisan plan to fix the country’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program before those protections run out on March 5.


BRANDON QUESTER / INEWSOURCE

This week on Fronteras:

  • A farmworker searches for migrants who go missing while crossing the border.
  • The demand for Mayan interpreters in the U.S. is on the rise (4:27).
  • The emotional health of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients who face losing their special status in March (10:42).


Mallory Falk

This week on Fronteras:

  • Rural West Texans scramble to try to find affordable health care. 
  • Border Patrol finds Guatemalans freezing at border (4:54). 
  • The Los Angeles Times uncovers corruption in Mexico’s housing developments (5:47). 
  • At a border reunion, a 14-year old boy gets an endearing birthday present (15:46).


Photo credit: Brandon Quester / inewsource

This week on Fronteras:

  • A look at the history of U.S. efforts to contain immigration and drug smuggling with barriers on our southern border with Mexico. (0:00)
  • Latinos say they continue to experience discrimination when trying to buy houses or rent homes. (4:28)
  • In Albuquerque, the Pueblo Film Festival presents a more realistic view of Native American stories. (8:56)
  • As San Antonio’s Tricentennial approaches, people are digging into their Spanish roots. (12:51)


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