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Books

Courtesy Lorenzo Gomez III

Lorenzo Gomez III grew up in one of San Antonio's most crime-riddled neighborhoods and his middle-school years were turbulent, traumatic, and even violent. These trying times led Lorenzo to a dark place, until he made an active effort to improve his mental health as an adult.


Public Domain http://bit.ly/32Zmoid

For many families, a house can be the greatest financial asset over a lifetime. More than two-thirds of Americans owned their own home by the new millennium, but the financial crisis in 2008 led to a debilitating collapse of the housing market. 


A family poses with Clifford the Big Red Dog at the Boerne Book and Arts Festival.
Kirk Thompson

You can enjoy the unique art of short films. Meet a heroic pilot who saved her plane and passengers. Or take a spooky tour of San Antonio's sexy past. The weekend’s here, and there’s plenty to do.


Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

Lorenzo Gomez is not a doctor, nor does he claim to be. The San Antonio tech industry advocate released his second book Tuesday, but it isn't about business or technology — it’s about mental health.

It's hard to think of another writer with as much Lone Star credibility as Stephen Harrigan. The Austin-based writer contributed to Texas Monthly magazine for decades, and his best-known book, The Gates of the Alamo, is widely considered to be the best novel about the epic battle ever written.

Harrigan, essentially, is to Texas literature what Willie Nelson is to Texas music.

Riverhead Books

In his book "Beneath a Ruthless Sun," Pulitzer Prize-winning author Gilbert King tells a true story of corruption and institutional bigotry.


From Texas Standard:

Plenty of issues divide Texans, but there are a few topics on which many can find common ground. They might include barbecue, Willie Nelson and the Tyler Rose – Earl Campbell.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

There's "The Catcher In The Rye," "Franny And Zooey," "Nine Stories." Chances are you've only read J.D. Salinger's work in one form, as text on paper. Even after the author died nine years ago, the caretakers of his estate would not budge.

Courtesy

Some politicians paint such a dire picture of the Texas/Mexico border it’s natural to wonder where all this is leading.


Many years ago, a relative of mine used the term "music-intense" in conversation to describe a musician we both knew.

I think it's also an apt descriptor for BBC music broadcaster Stephen Johnson. His remarkably diverse aesthetic and personal sensitivity are on full display in his new book How Shostakovich Changed My Mind.

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