Bill Zeeble | Texas Public Radio

Bill Zeeble

Bill Zeeble has been a full-time reporter at KERA since 1992, covering everything from medicine to the Mavericks and education to environmental issues. Heâââ

A small group of Conrad High School seniors in Dallas recently celebrated one of the first in-person graduations in the country. It almost didn’t happen because of COVID-19. 

Now that the Irving-based Boy Scouts of America has declared bankruptcy following sexual abuse lawsuits, victims are waiting for what happens next.  

A national survey out Wednesday shows that 4 out of 10 college students experienced food insecurity in the past month while about half of them are dealing with housing challenges. Some – 17% – are actually homeless.

Texas is all too familiar with grief after a church shooting. Sunday's gunfire in suburban Fort Worth came two years after the deadliest church shooting in modern history, when 26 people died in Sutherland Springs, Texas. This weekend also revived memories of a shooting two decades ago at a Fort Worth church just 10 miles away.

Every December, thousands of people buy toys, clothes and stocking-stuffers so families in need can have a happy holiday. But what happens when those donors forget items or buy the wrong size?

The future of a major Dallas interstate is up for discussion starting today.

The state is seeking public opinion on the future of Interstate Highway 345, the overhead freeway bridge in Deep Ellum. The interstate connects to major highways, including east-and westbound I-30 and north- and southbound I-35, U.S.75 and I-45. 

A free legal clinic for retired U.S. military veterans with service disabilities opens Thursday afternoon in Dallas.

It will be the 50th free clinic offered by Metroplex Veterans Legal Services. The nonprofit launched six years ago to help veterans get services they need and are entitled, but often don’t know about, says attorney and founder Joan Gillham.

Copyright 2019 KERA. To see more, visit KERA.

NOEL KING, HOST:

“No justice! No peace!”

The familiar chant was prompted by what protesters saw as a sentence too light for the murder of an innocent black man in his own apartment.

Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath says despite recent improvements in public education, it's not enough. At the Dallas Regional Chamber lunch Monday, he urged hundreds of business leaders to get involved with public schools.

Pages