Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

Norma Martinez

News Anchor

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra, and currently plays with the all-volunteer South Texas Symphonic Orchestra in San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

First Run Features

“That wooden box with four strings was made by a genius.”

A new documentary argues it was played by a genius as well.

The Cellist: The Legacy of Gregor Piatigorsky” (2018) explores the legacy of a man whose mission it was to popularize the cello.

UTSA Special Collections

Students across the Southwest walked out of class in the late 1960s and early 1970s to protest what they believed to be discriminatory policies directed at Mexican American students, including a ban on speaking Spanish on campus.

Mario Compean and Aurelio Montemayor were co-chairs of a recent conference in San Antonio that reflected on the Chicano student walkouts, 50 years later.

Courtesy of Octavio Quintailla

Pursue the preservation of poetry through education. Inspire established and emerging generations of literary artists and readers. Celebrate the literary voices of the San Antonio community. These are a few of the expectations of the San Antonio Poet Laureate. 

Every two years, a poet is chosen to fulfill these expectations as the ambassador for poetry and the literary arts in San Antonio. In 2012, San Antonio became the first major city in Texas to create this local appointment.


Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

There are 5.2 million known American Indians and Alaska Natives in the U.S., less than 2% of the nation’s overall population. Historically underrepresented — and undercounted — that population is often called “invisible.”

The upcoming U.S. census offers an opportunity to change that.


Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

Professional sports teams have been dogged with accusations of cultural impropriety.  The Washington Redskins and the Atlanta Braves have come under fire for offensive team names. Chief Wahoo, the cartoonish mascot of Cleveland Indians, was officially retired from team uniforms in 2018. 

Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

The Washington Redskins. The Atlanta Braves. The Kansas City Chiefs. Chief Wahoo -- the now-retired cartoonish mascot of the Cleveland Indians. Professional sports have often used offensive Native American terms or imagery for their team names or mascots. The NBA made an important step to amend those wrongs with an event this weekend in San Antonio.

The San Antonio Spurs hosted Indigenous Night Sunday. It paid homage to San Antonio’s indigenous cultures and native people from around the world.


Jack Morgan | Texas Public Radio

Hundreds of thousands of people traveled to city's East Side for today's Martin Luther King Jr. march.

A largely-forgotten court case about race discrimination in Texas schools is brought to life in a documentary.

It’s been a personal journey for the film’s executive producer.


Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

Thousands of people are expected to participate in San Antonio’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day march -- the largest in the United States -- on the city's East Side on Monday.

JD Doyle Archives

The story of the LGBTQ community in the early 20th century is buried deep in Texas history. A first-generation college student and young historian explored these lesser-known past events and early advocates and published his findings in the scholarly article, “Recovering Queer History in Texas: Female Impersonators, Public Opinion, and Policy Responses in the Early Twentieth Century.”

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