Lauren Terrazas | Texas Public Radio

Lauren Terrazas

Producer

Lauren Terrazas is an El Paso native and produces "Morning Edition" and "Fronteras" for Texas Public Radio. She began her work in broadcasting as an intern at KTEP, El Paso’s public radio station. While at KTEP, she went to become a production assistant and then chief announcer for "Morning Edition."

Lauren supervised part-time student employees and interns while producing local public affairs programs. She also created KTEP’s first production handbook.

She received her bachelor of arts degree in organizational and corporate communication from the University of Texas at El Paso in 2017 and is currently pursuing her master’s in public administration at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of the Texas General Land Office

Despite being met with opposition, renovation work is underway at the Alamo as the Texas General Land Office plans to restore and recapture the historical 1836 battle.

Karina Erickson, Communications Director with the GLO, said the project aims to elevate the Alamo to the level of the Gettysburg memorial in Pennsylvania.


Vanessa Velazquez

The Texas Historical Commission designated the Alamo a “Historic Texas Cemetery” in 2019, but local indigenous peoples and descendants of early settlers want to go a step further with an “unverified cemetery” designation

Ramón Juan Vásquez, executive director of the American Indians in Texas, said members of the Coahuiltecan Nation and descendents of early settlers have fought for recognition of the cemetery for 24 years.

Luis M. Garza

Latino arts and culture is rich, colorful and varied. The National Association of Latino Arts and Culture is dedicated to promoting, developing and cultivating Latinx artists. Sometimes, however, outside forces can take a toll on their community.

Maria López De León, president and CEO of NALAC, said the organization has not been shy around the country’s immigration debate.


Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Chicana writer Cherríe Moraga is the author of the literary memoir, “Native Country of the Heart.” It explores not just Moraga’s life, but that of her mother, Elvira.  Elvira was born in 1914. Her father hired 11-year-old Elvira and her siblings as cotton pickers in California. As a young teen, she worked at a Tijuana casino that was frequented by Hollywood stars and mob bosses.

Daniella Rossell

One of the leading voices in Latino literature centers her latest work on her close relationship with her mother. Cherríe Moraga aims to preserve her mother’s stories and memories in her literary memoir, Native Country of the Heart.


Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

U.S. Customs and Border Protection reported its agents apprehended more than 800,000 migrants since last October along the U.S.-Mexico border, and many took place in the Border Patrol's Del Rio sector.

Verónica G. Cárdenas

The U.S.-Mexico border recently dominated news headlines, from reports on overcrowded detention facilities to the “Stay in Mexico” policy. Two journalists say the region is more complex and culturally rich than what is portrayed in mainstream media

Then, young people living in San Antonio public housing get an education in art and culture in a printmaking summer workforce session.

Courtesy of Dept. of Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA

Thousands of asylum seekers arrive at the United States southern border, and an administration deems them as a threat to the country. This is not a depiction of our nation’s current immigration climate, but one from nearly four decades ago.

One Catholic priest defied the Reagan administration and the power of the Catholic Church to step up and support Central American refugees.

Courtesy of Sarah Ball

History is a rich, complicated topic that expands beyond textbooks. One Northwest Vista College professor is showing her students a different narrative to American history, allowing them to reflect on racism, oppression and empowerment.

Then, a San Antonio native, and a descendant of one of the founding families of the Alamo City, aims to preserve, maintain and share her family’s heritage dating back centuries. 

Courtesy of Texas Tech University Press

Tex-Mex cuisine has a special place in the hearts of Texans, but some may argue it’s not authentic food. Adán Medrano explores the ingredients and cooking techniques brought to the region centuries ago by the indigenous people and what defines ‘Texas Mexican’ cooking.

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