Lauren Terrazas | Texas Public Radio

Lauren Terrazas

Producer

Lauren Terrazas is an El Paso native and produces "Morning Edition" and "Fronteras" for Texas Public Radio. She began her work in broadcasting as an intern at KTEP, El Paso’s public radio station. While at KTEP, she went to become a production assistant and then chief announcer for "Morning Edition."

Lauren supervised part-time student employees and interns while producing local public affairs programs. She also created KTEP’s first production handbook.

She received her bachelor of arts degree in organizational and corporate communication from the University of Texas at El Paso in 2017 and is currently pursuing her master’s in public administration at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Dept. of Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA

Thousands of asylum seekers arrive at the United States southern border, and an administration deems them as a threat to the country. This is not a depiction of our nation’s current immigration climate, but one from nearly four decades ago.

One Catholic priest defied the Reagan administration and the power of the Catholic Church to step up and support Central American refugees.

Courtesy of Sarah Ball

History is a rich, complicated topic that expands beyond textbooks. One Northwest Vista College professor is showing her students a different narrative to American history, allowing them to reflect on racism, oppression and empowerment.

Then, a San Antonio native, and a descendant of one of the founding families of the Alamo City, aims to preserve, maintain and share her family’s heritage dating back centuries. 

Courtesy of Texas Tech University Press

Tex-Mex cuisine has a special place in the hearts of Texans, but some may argue it’s not authentic food. Adán Medrano explores the ingredients and cooking techniques brought to the region centuries ago by the indigenous people and what defines ‘Texas Mexican’ cooking.

Adán Medrano, courtesy of Texas Tech University Press

San Antonio native and chef Adán Medrano is author of “Don’t Count the Tortillas: The Art of Texas Mexican Cooking” (June 25, 2019, Texas Tech University Press).

The recipes in his book draw on authentic Mexican ingredients that make an emotional connection with him. It’s what he calls Texas Mexican cuisine.

Esperanza Peace & Justice Center

Poor communities that have a rich cultural history often battle developers and city officials who may want to demolish structures to make way for improved public housing, parking lots or apartment buildings.

Sarah Zenaida Gould, co-chair of Latinos in Heritage Conservation, said good intentions aside, it’s not what’s best for the community.


Esperanza Peace & Justice Center

Historic preservation is defined as the conservation of buildings, landscapes or other artifacts with historical significance, but structures with cultural significance continue to be demolished in communities across the U.S.

Social justice in historic preservation is now gaining traction and there are more efforts to protect areas that have long been rooted in a community’s history.


Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

After years of contentious debate, the Texas State Board of Education approved a Mexican American Studies (MAS) curriculum in 2018. Now, members of the community have an opportunity to learn how they can implement the courses into classrooms at the 4th Annual Statewide Summit on Mexican American Studies for Texas Schools.

Then, a new historical marker honors Tejano music legend, Lydia Mendoza.


Lydia Mendoza image: Michael Ochs Archive/Getty Images. Historical marker credited to Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio.

Lydia Mendoza, known as “La Alondra de la Fronteras (The Lark of the Border),” would have turned 103 on May 31. She was honored the day after her birthday with a historical marker at her gravesite at San Fernando Catholic Cemetery No. 2 in San Antonio.


Molly Adams | Flickr (CC BY 2.0) http://bit.ly/2Wn67EF

A path to citizenship may be extended to over 2 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States after the U.S. House of Representatives passed the American Dream and Promise Act Tuesday night. The fate of H.R. 6 now lies in the hands of the Republican-led Senate.


Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Presidential candidate Julián Castro says too many lives have been cut short by a broken police system. The former Housing Secretary hopes to fix that system in his newest policy proposal revealed Monday.

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