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Government & Public Policy

News about politics and government.

From Texas Standard:

Polls show that the country is nearly evenly split about whether President Donald Trump should be impeached. That might put Texas politicians in a precarious position given that Texas isn't the reliably conservative state it once was. Lawmakers who support Trump will please their base of supporters, but they also risk alienating others.

Brian Kirkpatrick / Texas Public Radio

Hundreds turned out late Friday afternoon at Juarez Plaza at La Villita in downtown San Antonio for a rally to support former Democratic Vice President Joe Biden’s bid for the White House.

A poll of likely Texas voters released by CNN Thursday shows Biden as the front-runner among Democratic candidates.

U.S. Census Bureau Director Steve Dillingham visited UTSA Nov. 22, 2019 during a stop in San Antonio ahead of the 2020 Census.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

The 2020 Census has high stakes for the state of Texas. Billions of dollars in federal funding for education, transportation and health care are on the line, and Texas is home to a lot of people that the U.S. Census Bureau has historically had a hard time counting.

GOP Party Chair James Dickey (left) and Democratic Party Chair Gilberto Hinojosa (right).
Courtesy of respective party chair websites

In past elections, Texas Democratic Party Chairman Gilberto Hinojosa remembers how hard it was to find candidates who wanted to run for office. 

Nathan Cone / TPR

Recorded on November 6, 2019, this World Affairs Council of San Antonio event features the Right Honorable Henry McLeish, former First Minister of Scotland, speaking on the politics and personalities of Brexit. Focusing on the current political actions involving the United Kingdom and the European Union, McLeish addresses why Brexit has not happened yet, and discusses possibilities around a new Brexit deal. 

The Latinx vote is still up for grabs by both parties in Texas.

A new report from the University of Houston's Center for Mexican American Studies shows the decisive role this voting bloc could play in the 2020 presidential election.

Latinx — a gender-neutral term referring to people in that community — are expected to become the largest population group in Texas by 2022, which gives them "a tremendous amount of clout," the report’s lead author Brandon Rottinghaus says.

From Texas Standard:

Political dynamics in Texas are shifting. That’s, in part, because of a growing Asian population, as well as a massive wave of young people migrating here from other parts of the country. Some argue all that could shift the state from red to blue. But these demographic changes are also happening at the same time as city populations are surging – something some Texas researchers say is an overlooked factor.

Texas Democrats See Opportunity In 2020 House Races

Jul 22, 2019

From Texas Standard:

While no one expects Texas to "turn blue" any time soon, an energized Democratic Party could mean tighter races for the Texas House of Representatives in 2020. In 2018, winning margins in 17 House races were 10% or less. And 10 of those were in North Texas

Updated at 10:45 p.m. ET

The Trump administration has decided to print the 2020 census forms without a citizenship question, and the printer has been told to start the printing process, Justice Department spokesperson Kelly Laco confirms to NPR.

Ballot Measure Aims To Protect State Park Funding

Jul 2, 2019

From Texas Standard:

The fate of the Texas state park system will be on the ballot in November. Voters will decide whether to strengthen the rules that currently reserve sales taxes paid on sporting goods to fund parks, or, if they vote "no," to continue allowing the money to be siphoned off for other uses. 

Taxes on sporting goods have been dedicated to park funding since 1993, but legislators have continually found other uses for the money – up to 40% has ended up in the state's general fund over those 25 years. Lack of funding, and greater demand for park access by a growing population has left many facilities in disrepair.

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