History | Texas Public Radio

History

Jack Morgan / Texas Public Radio

Just up Interstate 10, about 50 miles northwest of San Antonio, stands a monument in a small town that's unlike any monument in Texas.

 


Urrutia Photo Collection

Updated 2:47 p.m.

You may have seen it while driving on Hildebrand, approaching Broadway, there’s a massive, tiled gate. Inside are curious sculptures and benches. It’s called Miraflores, and its past is fascinating. Now it appears its future will be, too.


From Texas Standard.

When we think about countries that pose a nuclear threat to the United States, North Korea probably tops the list. But in 1962, at the height of the Cold War, it was the Soviet Union whose missiles kept the U.S. on high alert. And some of those nuclear missiles were as close to the U.S. as 90 miles – in Cuba. A new book explores the Cuban Missile Crisis through the little-known story of U.S. pilots who flew U-2 spy planes in an attempt to find out what sort of threat the Soviets’ armaments posed.

www.everettfly.com

The story of San Antonio is entwined with that of the Spaniards, Mexicans, Native Americans, and Anglo settlers. But the African-American story of the Alamo City is not one that’s widely known.


Pixabay (Public Domain)

On this episode of "Texas Matters," we look at:

  • Politics in the classroom
  • Sam Houston’s Last Days (12:06)


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