Fronteras | Texas Public Radio

Fronteras

Courtesy of Marcus Huerta, UTSA

Conserving historic sites goes beyond protecting a physical structure. Heritage preservation takes into account the identities and values that bind people to places. It is an ongoing effort in a city that’s best known for its historical significance. The University of Texas at San Antonio has been exploring over 300 years of cultural heritage in South and Central Texas. 

William Dupont and Angela Lombardi, Ph.D, said the Alamo City is a prime location for their heritage preservation research, with its deep historical roots intertwined with a rich culture that defines the city.

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

Leadership institutes provide young professionals with training to become engaging leaders in their communities. But obstacles often exist when those young professionals are undocumented immigrants in the U.S.


Luis M. Garza

Latino arts and culture is rich, colorful and varied. The National Association of Latino Arts and Culture is dedicated to promoting, developing and cultivating Latinx artists. Sometimes, however, outside forces can take a toll on their community.

Maria López De León, president and CEO of NALAC, said the organization has not been shy around the country’s immigration debate.


Beinecke Collection Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University

Before the Battle of the Alamo, the Spanish dominated what’s now known as the American Southwest. They documented hundreds of years of history at the time — most of which was lost before the end of the 19th century.

Raúl Coronado, author and associate professor at UC Berkeley, discusses the importance of Spanish print culture in his book, “A World Not to Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture.”

Bean & Chisme Facebook page.

Two San Antonio women are using their deep ties to the media industry to embrace a subculture that is very much alive in the Alamo City. Their live webcasts are tapping into a whole new audience through hints of nostalgia mixed with modern day — and often unspoken — themes.

Nina Duran and Samantha Najera join us to talk about Bean & Chisme.


http://aztecadeamerica.weebly.com

Gino Rivera, director of Mariachi Azteca de America, and Debra Torres, director of the all-female Mariachi Flor de Jalisco, both live and work in San Antonio.

Torres says her love of mariachi music didn’t come right away. She knew she wanted to play classical violin, and her violin teacher encouraged her to join a mariachi group in San Antonio.  


In his memoir “The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border,” Francisco Cantú uses a writing technique that might strike readers as unusual.

When he is writing dialogue, he omits quotation marks.

Cantú said quotation marks pull us away from the action on the page.

Laila Kazmi /KCTS-TV 9

This week on Fronteras:

  • Now that temporary protected status for people in the U.S. from El Salvador has ended, hear how workers in Houston are dealing with the uncertainty.
  • Property taxes of adobe homes in Marfa skyrocket (3:50).
  • Muslim Americans honor Martin Luther King Jr. with a day of service (7:59).
  • A Latina conductor strikes a chord in Seattle (11:40).
  • Mexican-American studies touch the lives of San Antonio students (16:49).


BRANDON QUESTER / INEWSOURCE

This week on Fronteras:

  • “Promotoras” initiative to help some San Antonio families on the west side reduce incidents of child abuse.
  • New Mexico aims to get more students of color into nursing programs (8:19).
  • A modern day vigilante stands guard on his property along the U.S./Mexico border (12:08).
  • A Dallas artist takes a whack at gentrification with a Latin party favor (16:14).


Tamales
Marten Holdway / http://bit.ly/2CRXEeu / Pixabay Creative Commons

This week on Fronteras:

  • The rich history of tamales.
  • Remembering a Pearl Harbor hero in Waco (12:56).
  • Ballet dancer lives the American dream performing “The Nutcracker” (15:37).


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