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San Antonio soccer fans join the Men's World Cup's global audience

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WHERE TO WATCH THE GAMES

The final rounds of games are scheduled for either 9 a.m and 1 p.m. If you're at the office and can't get away, you can watch them on a smartphone or computer. Just don't let it disrupt your productivity. NPR offers several options for where to watch the games on TV and where to stream them online.

Several spots in San Antonio have consistently offered watch parties, and by now most fans have their favorite bars or restaurants. Given the intensifying popularity of the Men's World Cup since mid-November, most establishments that regularly televise sports events will likely have at least one TV tuned to the afternoon games, depending on their business hours. All times CST.

The businesses below have hosted watch parties in recent weeks. Check with them to see if they plan to offer any more, particularly on Dec. 17 and 18, when the final games will be played.

  • Smoke BBQ + Skybar: 501 East Crockett St.
  • Chicken N Pickle: 5215 UTSA Blvd.
  • The Lucky Duck SATX: 810 North Alamo St.
  • Roadmap Brewing Co.: 723 North Alamo
  • Dave & Busters: Check location
  • The Growler Exchange: 4130 Broadway St #2
  • The Hangar Bar & Grill: 8203 Broadway
  • Europa Restaurant & Bar: 8811 Fredericksburg Rd.
  • Stout House TPC: 22810 US Highway 281, Ste 103
  • Trisha's Social Sips / Wheatley Heights Sports Complex: 200 Noblewood

Quarterfinals

Friday, Dec. 9
Croatia v. Brazil, 9 a.m. / Netherlands v. Argentina, 1 p.m.

Saturday, Dec. 10
Morocco v. Portugal, 9 a.m. / France v. England, 1 p.m.


Semifinals
Dec. 13 to Dec. 14

Third place playoff
Dec. 17, 9 a.m.

Final
Dec. 18, 9 a.m.


PAST GAMES AND ANALYSIS

FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 - Group B - United States v Wales
PEDRO NUNES
/
REUTERS
United States fans wearing fancy dresses during the U.S.-Wales game on Nov. 21, 2022.

Sunday, Nov. 20
Qatar 0 — Ecuador 2

Related coverage

Monday, Nov. 21
England 6 — Iran 2
Senegal 0 — Netherlands 2
USA 1 — Wales 1

    Related coverage

    FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 - Group B - United States v Wales
    HANNAH MCKAY
    /
    REUTERS
    A U.S. fan in the stands before the U.S.-Wales game on Nov. 21, 2022.

    Tuesday, Nov. 22
    Argentina 1— Saudi Arabia 2
    Denmark 0 — Tunisia 0
    Mexico 0 — Poland 0
    France 4 — Australia 1

    Related coverage

    Wednesday, Nov. 23
    Morocco 0 — Croatia 0
    Germany 1 — Japan 2
    Spain 7 — Costa Rica 0
    Belgium 1 — Canada 0

      Related coverage

      Thursday, Nov. 24
      Switzerland 1 — Cameroon 0
      Uruguay 0 — South Korea 0
      Portugal 3 — Ghana 2
      Brazil 2 — Serbia 0

      Related coverage

      Friday, Nov. 25
      Wales 0 — Iran 2
      Qatar 1 — Senegal 3
      Netherlands 1 — Ecuador 1
      England 0 — USA 0

        Related coverage

        Saturday, Nov. 26
        Tunisia 0 — Australia 1
        Poland 2 — Saudi Arabia 0
        France 2 — Denmark 1
        Argentina 2 — Mexico 0

          Related coverage

          Sunday, Nov. 27
          Japan 0 — Costa Rica 1
          Belgium 0 — Morocco 2
          Croatia 4 — Canada 1
          Spain 1 — Germany 1

          Related coverage

          Monday, Nov. 28
          Cameroon 3 — Serbia 3
          South Korea 2 — Ghana 3
          Brazil 1 — Switzerland 0
          Portugal 2 — Uruguay 0

          Related coverage

          Tuesday, Nov. 29
          Netherlands 2 — Qatar 0
          Ecuador 1 — Senegal 2
          Wales 0 — England 3
          Iran 0 — USA 1

            Related coverage

            Wednesday, Nov. 30
            Tunisia 1 — France 0
            Australia 1 — Denmark 0
            Poland 0 — Argentina 2
            Saudi Arabia 1 — Mexico 2

              Related coverage

              Thursday, Dec. 1
              Croatia 0 — Belgium 0
              Canada 1 — Morocco 2
              Japan 2 — Spain 1
              Costa Rica 2 — Germany 4

              Related coverage

              Friday, Dec. 2
              South Korea 2 — Portugal 1
              Ghana 0 — Uruguay 2
              Cameroon 1 — Brazil 0
              Serbia 2 — Switzerland 3

              Related coverage

              Saturday, Dec. 3
              Netherlands 3 — USA 1
              Argentina 2 — Australia 1

              Related coverage

              Round of 16: Sunday, Dec. 4
              France 3 — Poland 1
              England 3 — Senegal 0

              Related coverage

              Round of 16: Monday, Dec. 5
              Japan 1 (1) — Croatia 1 (3)
              Brazil 4 — South Korea 1

              Round of 16: Tuesday, Dec. 6
              Morocco 0 (3) — Spain 0 (0)
              Portugal 6 — Switzerland 1


              BACKGROUND

              What is the Men's World Cup?

              The FIFA Men's World Cup is the global soccer championship that brings together teams representing dozens of nations — 32 nations this year, including the United States — to compete for the FIFA World Cup trophy. Teams spend about two years trying to qualify to play in the World Cup.

              FIFA stands for "Fédération Internationale de Football Association," which is the international association that manages the games. The tournament has been played every four years since the 1930s (the 1942 and 1946 championships were canceled because of World War II).

              Usually, one country hosts the games. Competition between nations to be selected is often fierce, and the final decision is usually controversial. The U.S. hosted the games in 1994. Russia hosted the last World Cup in 2018. This year, Qatar, a nation on the Persian Gulf, is the host.

              In 2002, for the first time, multiple countries — Japan and South Korea — shared the hosting honors. In 2026, Canada, Mexico and the U.S. will share the games among 17 cities — including Houston and Arlington. Houston Public Media recently reported that officials from Houston visited the Qatar games for insight into how to host World Cup games.

              The World Cup usually takes place in the summer, but because of Qatar's heat, the 2022 games were moved into the winter, from mid November to mid December.

              FIFA's selection of Qatar was one of the most controversial decisions in recent memory. Qatar is a conservative nation governed by Islamic law, and its record on human rights, rights for women, rules on gender equality, and rights for workers (who spent more than a decade building the World Cup facilities) have been the focus of scrutiny and condemnation. Read more news coverage of those issues below.

              What is the Women's World Cup?

              FIFA's Women's World Cup is also held every four years. The U.S. team won the 2019 faceoff with the Netherlands — the U.S. team has won the trophy four times. The next one is in 2023, from July 20 to Aug. 20. Australia and New Zealand will host that competition — the first time two nations host the women's games.

              The Women's World Cup was established in 1991 as a 12-team tournament. In 2023, it will feature teams from 32 nations — a reflection of the massive growth and popularity of women's soccer around the world.

              Some fans consider the Women's World Cup — in terms of skill, intelligence of strategy and tactics, and overall quality of teams -- far superior to the men's championship.

              The Women's World Cup has endured and fought against systemic FIFA problems, most notably huge differences in award money. In the U.S., however, as the men's team triumphs, so does the women's team. NPR recently reported that the "two squads are evenly splitting the World Cup prize money they earn."

              More about the World Cup

              Check out the New York Times FAQ for more answers to World Cup questions.


              MORE RESOURCES

              NPR and The Texas Newsroom

              Other news coverage

              Qatar: The human cost of a championship

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