Photos From Day To Night, Here's What San Antonio Looks Like In The Wake Of COVID-19 | Texas Public Radio

Photos From Day To Night, Here's What San Antonio Looks Like In The Wake Of COVID-19

Mar 26, 2020

Just before midnight on Tuesday night, a stay-at-home order went into effect in the Alamo City. The order, intended to crub the reach of COVID-19 asks that citizens only leave their homes if necessary. As San Antonio residents adjust to an altered way of life, the city has never looked more different. Originally published on Wednesday, March 25, at 4:31 p.m.

An H-E-B employee lets shoppers into the store as others leave.
Credit David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

Line in front of H-E-B in deco district about 7:40 am. People at front said they had arrived at 6:30 am.
Credit Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

The order, issued by Mayor Ron Nirenberg and other city officials, requests that San Antonio residents only leave home if necessary, like to buy groceries.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

Weeks before the stay-at-home order was issued, Trinity University announced to its students that residence halls would close March 16. Students and their families packed up during what was supposed to be the last few days of the students' spring break.
Credit Dominic Anthony | Texas Public Radio

Multiple recreational areas have closed to comply with the order, including movie theaters and malls, like La Cantera on the Northside.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

San Antonians still found ways to get fresh air in the days before the order was issued. The order asks that residents stay home unless necessary. Outdoor activity is allowed, so long as people practice social distancing.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

Two people enjoy Brackenridge Park in the last day before the city's stay-at-home order will be enacted. The order asks Bexar County residents only to leave their homes if necessary and includes outdoor activities so long as social distance is maintained.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

Two days into the mayor's stay-at-home order, and the River Walk is empty.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio
The streets of downtown are empty as San Antonio citizens stay at home.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio
Even Alamo Plaza is deserted during the stay-at-home order.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio
There's not a car in sight on E Commerce St. after the mayor's stay-at-home order.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio
Downtown San Antonio is empty, on the street level and on the River Walk.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio
The live entertainment industry has been hit particularly hard by fallout from the spreading virus, especially after the CDC issued guidance in mid-March encouraging Americans to avoid gatherings of more than 10 people, followed by many cities shuttering bars and other non-essential businesses.
Credit Dominic Anthony | Texas Public Radio

After 7 p.m. on weekend nights, the St. Mary's Strip is usually crowded. But after San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg, Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff and Texas Governor Greg Abbott shut down all bars, the area is empty.
Credit Dominic Anthony | Texas Public Radio

Bars and restaurants, like Bombay Bicycle Club on St. Mary's Street, are getting around the order and maintaining business by offering take-out and to-go options for customers, even for alcoholic beverages.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

After cities, counties and states restricted restaurants to take-out only, businesses emphasized curbside pickup and drive-through options.Credit Dominic Anthony | Texas Public RadioEdit | Remove

Many restaurants are maintaining their businesses by offering take out and curbside service, like P.F. Chang's in the Quarry.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio
Though restaurants in the Quarry remain open for curbside to-go service, a majority of the other businesses are closed, including the Regal Alamo Quarry theater and Gold's Gym.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio
Multiple movie theaters in San Antonio are closed, including Santikos Entertainment Palladium in the Rim.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

Even the zoo has had to close until further notice.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

Credit Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

Many go-to joints, like the Friendly Spot in Southtown, are closed to comply with Mayor Nirenberg's stay-at-home order.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

The order also asks that, if citizens are to leave the house, that they be safe.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

Three hours before Mayor Nirenberg's order went into action, I-35 was quiet.
Credit Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio