Carson Frame | Texas Public Radio

Carson Frame

Reporter, Military and Veterans Issues

Carson graduated from the University of South Florida in 2011 with a B.A. in English and international studies, and earned a master's degree in journalism from New York University in 2017. Prior to coming to San Antonio, she worked as a news intern for WUSF Public Media, the NPR affiliate in Tampa, Florida. She's also contributed stories to Ms. Magazine, Chronogram, Souciant, and Bedford+Bowery, among others. Carson's audio work has appeared on the podcasts "Death, Sex & Money" (WNYC) and "Memory Motel" (Listening Booth Media).

Carson's reporting on military issues is part of The American Homefront Project, a public media collaboration that reports on American military life and veterans. Funding comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. 

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Kathryn Fink | American Homefront

After years of complaints, the Pentagon is trying to reform the way it manages the moving process for military families. The current system is plagued by delays, lost shipments, theft, and lack of accountability.

Photo by Senior Airman Tristin English / 502nd Air Base Wing Public Affairs

Hundreds gathered for a memorial service to celebrate the life of retired Air Force Lt. Col. Richard “Dick” Cole at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph on Thursday. Cole was the last surviving member of the Doolittle Raiders, a daring group of World War II airmen who bombed Tokyo only months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. He passed away in San Antonio on April 9 at age 103.

Ted Eytan / Wikimedia

The policy bans transgender recruits and prevents current troops from transitioning to another sex unless they were diagnosed with gender dysphoria before April 12.

The Defense Department has implemented a Trump administration policy that bars transgender recruits from joining the military. The policy took effect April 12, though several lawsuits challenging it are pending in federal courts.

DVIDS Hub http://bit.ly/2WwUiHA

A University of Texas at San Antonio researcher uncovered new information about how battlefield trauma care evolved during the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Troops' survival rates increased three-fold as the conflicts wore on, even as injuries became more severe.

Lisa Ferdinando / DoD

Open air burn pits were once a common method of waste disposal used by the U.S. military. More than 250 burned in Iraq and Afghanistan — and thousands of veterans exposed to the fumes have since reported health problems. The Department of Veterans Affairs keeps a nationwide registry of those affected but critics say it’s not comprehensive enough.

Clarissa Robles / Phipps Deacon Purnell PLLC

About twenty San Antonio veterans filed suit against 3M, maker of worker safety and healthcare products. The veterans said they suffered hearing damage during their service because of faulty earplugs made by the company. On Thursday, their attorneys announced the case on the steps of the John H. Wood, Jr. Federal Courthouse.

Carson Frame / TPR News

A traveling memorial that pays tribute to those who lost their lives during the Vietnam War arrived at San Antonio’s Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery Thursday. Known as “The Wall That Heals,” it is a three-quarter scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., and includes the names of more than 58,000 service members who perished in the line of duty.

Credit: Ruth A. Medina-Villanueva, 502nd Air Base Wing Public Affairs

New recruits at Lackland Air Force Base shuffle into a room stacked high with shoe boxes. They’re in the middle of one of their first rites of passage: uniform issue. Trainers usher them around to different clothing stations to be fitted for all types of gear. Some recruits look flustered. They wear camouflage with the tags still on it.

Carson Frame / Texas Public Radio

Congressman Joaquin Castro introduced legislation earlier this month that called for the Department of Veterans Affairs to offer relief to veterans exposed to burn pits.

Carson Frame / Texas Public Radio

Twenty airmen left Lackland Air Force Base in the early hours of Friday morning with rucksacks on their backs. It’s the start of a tribute march journey that will take them across five states and 830 miles.

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