© 2020 Texas Public Radio
Real. Reliable. Texas Public Radio.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
News

City Council Approves Contract Extension And Higher Salary for City Manager

SherylSculley_1.JPG
Joey Palacios
/
Texas Public Radio
City Manager Sheryl Sculley

San Antonio City Manager Sheryl Sculley will be getting a $75,000 raise over the next three years after the city council approved a new compensation package in an 8-3 vote.  However, not all council members were happy as some portions of the contract were finalized.

Following the council vote Sheryl Sculley is now receiving$425,000 and will get another $25,000 in 2017 and 2018. She’s also receiving her last retention bonus at $65,000. The city council will implement a new metric based system to award up to a $100,000 bonus every year.

Mayor Ivy Taylor says those metrics could include successfully expanding a street maintenance program, progress on airport improvements, and possibly creating a succession plan if Sculley ever leaves her position. “I think having the metrics in place is tremendous progress and demonstrates accountability to the council and to the public. I think they’ll be reflective of what our community priorities are,” the mayor said.

Exact metrics will be put in place by March 15th. Councilmembers Ray Lopez, Cris Medina, and Shirley Gonzalez voted against the new contract. Not having the metrics already set is where District six Councilman Ray Lopez says he felt uncomfortable. “Let’s wait till those goals are set out and then we can have a discussion on exactly how that money is going to be spent and we can articulate how those $100,000 are going to be yielding reward to the city.”

District 7 Councilman Cris Medina says the contract wasn’t made available in time for him to support it. “I just feel we didn’t have enough time to truly vet it. We received it the night before.”

Medina says he also had issue with the unresolved police and fire contract negotiations. When Sculley’s pay caps out at $475,000 in 2018, she will make more than ten times San Antonio’s median income.