Texas Farm Bureau | Texas Public Radio

Texas Farm Bureau

Ryan E. Poppe

Many rural groundwater conservation boards are considering or have already decided to export some of their water to nearby urban centers. Farmers are concerned the state is developing a Robin Hood system for its water needs, one where landowners lose.

 


Photo by Michael Stravato / The Texas Tribune

The Texas Supreme Court on Friday handed a victory to farmers, ranchers and other longstanding water rights holders by declining to take up a Brazos River case with widespread implications for future water battles in drought-prone Texas.

99 percent of Texas counties are in drought according to the Texas Water Development Board.  What does this mean for Texas Agriculture.  Last year 12 billion dollars were paid out in federal crop insurance across the country, but we have a record planting of corn this year. And there is no garauntee that an early fall won't wipe that planting out.  

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

When it comes to water in Texas, unless you’re a farmer, most people in the state don’t care.

A public opinion poll conducted by faculty members at the University of Texas in association with the Texas Tribune found that the economy, immigration and education are top of mind for most, yet water registers as a top issue with only 4 percent.