Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

Ryan Poppe

State Capitol Reporter

Ryan started his radio career in 2002 working for Austin’s News Radio KLBJ-AM as a show producer for the station's organic gardening shows. This slowly evolved into a role as the morning show producer and later as the group’s executive producer.

Eventually converting into an on-air reporter, Ryan has covered topics ranging from crime to the political process at the state capitol.

Ryan and his wife Mary own a home in Leander. He enjoys spending time at many of areas parks and outdoor spots with his son Luke and listening to live music at some of Austin jazz and reggae hotspots.  

Ryan is the cook in the family and it is understood that the kitchen is his territory. His favorite menu items range from Jamaican to North African fare to modern Thai-cuisine.

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Epileptic Council

Texas has one of the most restrictive medical marijuana programs in the country, according experts who track marijuana laws. But some lawmakers from both parties are ready to change that.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

Updated on March 7, 2019.

Texas leads the nation in arrests for possessing small amounts of marijuana. According to the most recent statistics available, there were 60,000 arrests in 2016 over possession of less than an ounce of the drug.

July 2016
Ryan Poppe / TPR News

The United States House Permanant Select-Committee on Intelligence heard closed-door testimony Thursday from President Trump’s former attorney Michael Cohen. 

Congressman Joaquin Castro, a San Antonio Democrat, said the American people can expect to see more criminal charges for key operatives in the Trump campaign based on testimony they received.

KUT.org

Texas lawmakers want to end a backlog of untested rape kits. A bipartisan bill introduced Tuesday aimed to help thousands of women find justice and closure. The legislation was named after a sexual assault survivor who was denied justice after waiting decades for her evidence to be tested.

Texas A&M University

During the years after the Civil War, communities of African Americans worked together throughout southeastern Texas to form what historians call freedom colonies. Research underway at Texas A&M University in Bryan-College Station aims to identify and preserve these historic black settlements.

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