Carson Frame | Texas Public Radio

Carson Frame

Reporter, Military and Veterans Issues

Carson graduated from the University of South Florida in 2011 with a B.A. in English and international studies, and earned a master's degree in journalism from New York University in 2017. Prior to coming to San Antonio, she worked as a news intern for WUSF Public Media, the NPR affiliate in Tampa, Florida. She's also contributed stories to Ms. Magazine, Chronogram, Souciant, and Bedford+Bowery, among others. Carson's audio work has appeared on the podcasts "Death, Sex & Money" (WNYC) and "Memory Motel" (Listening Booth Media).

Carson's reporting on military issues is part of The American Homefront Project, a public media collaboration that reports on American military life and veterans. Funding comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. 

Ways to Connect

Brian Kirkpatrick / Texas Public Radio

Updated Wednesday at 5:35 p.m.

An Air Force plane that crashed Tuesday in a field off Nacogdoches Road, north of Loop 1604, experienced engine failure, officials said in a news release Wednesday.

The plane is a T-6 Texan II training plane from Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, said Randy Martin, spokesman for the 12th Flying Training Wing.

Veterans now make up less than 20 percent of Congress, compared with about 75 percent in the 1960s. Some high-profile candidates are trying to reverse that trend.

Carson Frame / TPR News

Updated Sept. 6.

The Air Force has been battling a manpower crisis for several years as it continues to lose pilots to the lucrative airline industry. The total force faces a shortfall of about 2,000 pilots — the bulk of them fighters. It’s now exploring ways of modernizing its training pipeline, with the goal of making it faster and less expensive.


Burrell Parmer / Contributed Photo

This week, more than 20 retired U.S. military officers sent a public letter to Defense Secretary Jim Mattis expressing concern about a plan to house thousands of migrant children and families on military bases in Texas and Arkansas.

From 2009 to 2016, the Defense Department recruited more than 10,000 non-citizens into the armed forces. Now some say they're being discharged without explanation.

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