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The Walls Unit in Huntsville where death row inmates are executed.
Jack Morgan | Texas Public Radio

Texas death row inmate Larry Swearingen was executed Wednesday evening for the 1998 murder of Melissa Trotter. She was a 19-year-old student at Lone Star College on the Montgomery County campus.

Pixabay CC0: http://bit.ly/2SMW5rm

The legalization of hemp in Texas had unintended consequences. Determining the difference between now legal hemp and still illegal marijuana requires technology that's both expensive and hard to come by, so most big-city prosecutors – including in Bexar County – are dropping low-level pot charges until the state comes up with a fix.


Brian Kirkpatrick | Texas Public Radio

Ninety-year-old infrastructure that created Guadalupe County's six lakes is in dire need of repair and poses a significant safety risk. Four dams are at a high risk of collapse and two other spill gates have failed already.


pixabay CC0: http://bit.ly/32hs8nB

Four in 10 insured American adults say they have dealt with an unexpected medical bill.

Many were shocked to find out they owed thousands of dollars after receiving care at a facility or from a provider they assumed was in-network.

  

Libreshot/Public Domain http://bit.ly/2KNDhq9

Texas’ Compassionate Use Program (CUP) was first established in 2015. Its initial iteration was one of the country’s most restrictive. 

House Bill 3703 from the 2019 state legislative session expanded the list of qualifying conditions that physicians can use to prescribe medical cannabis. 


Veronica G. Cardenas for Texas Public Radio

A former U.S. ambassador to Mexico warned that the recent drama over tariffs on Mexican products may not be over. He's worried it may resume in three months.

President Donald Trump's threat to impose tariffs on Mexico was designed to pressure America’s top trading partner into taking action to prevent Central American immigrants from reaching the southern U.S. border.

The tariffs were scheduled to take effect on Monday, June 10. But on the previous Friday, Trump tweeted that Mexican officials “agreed to take strong measures to stem the tide of migration.”

David McSpadden CC BY 2.0: http://bit.ly/2wCFPis

San Antonio's construction industry is booming, but there aren't enough qualified people to do the work.


Contributed Photo

The names of 95,000 registered voters were flagged Friday by the Texas secretary of state's office for what it said were possible issues of valid citizenship, prompting pushback and even litigation from civil rights groups. A few days later, the state office quietly called counties to let them know many of those voters names actually should not have made the list.


Public Domain

The cattle drive of the Old West was all about connecting the $4 cow in San Antonio with the $40 market in Kansas — and making that connection depended on cowboys.  For these saddle tramps, the cattle drive was just a job, but somehow it became an American myth.

Tim Lehman's "Up the Trail" reveals that reality was vastly different than the American myth told in dime novels, TV shows and in song.


The film “Hidden Figures” tells the true story of Katherine G. Johnson , an African American mathematician who helped calculate the trajectories for Project Mercury and the 1969 Apollo 11 flight to the Moon. But Johnson was not alone. There were other African Americans at NASA and each had their own heroic mission against racism and Jim Crow.

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