Science | Texas Public Radio

Science

From Texas Standard:

For more than 130 years, a mill has been a landmark of the Johnson City community. It’s served as a steam grist mill, cotton gin, feed mill and even a restaurant. But it was vacant for a while, until its latest tenant moved in: a science museum.

Flickr user @doug88888 / cc

Both the Texas Senate and House of Representatives have passed legislation that would loosen restrictions on terminal patients accessing experimental drugs that aren't approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. If signed into affect by Gov. Abbott the law would make  Texas the 17th state to approve such measures. 

What could the law change mean for the terminally ill in Texas? Will this affect scientific research?

Guest:

WikiCommons http://bit.ly/1Dv04HW

The black hole theory is one of the most famous in history. Whether you call it a frozen star, magic circle, or black star, black holes have captured the world’s imagination, inspiring everything from research to science fiction.

In her new book Black Hole, Marcia Bartusiak, an MIT Professor of Science Writing, explores the history of the black hole, the science behind the mystery, and its effects on astronomy. 

Although beloved today, black holes were not always well regarded in the scientific community.

Mark Menzies http://bit.ly/1KnL2K6

Have you ever wondered about the physics of slipping on a banana peel? How about the Marxist interpretation of people's fascination with Duchess Middleton's posterior? No, really? What about the incidence of human injury and death by being crushed by a vending machine?

Well someone has wondered, researched and published studies on all of these questions.  And chances are, while you hadn't wondered about any of these things before, you kind of do now? 

The Source: How Touch Touches Our Lives

Mar 31, 2015
Credit: Wikicommons http://bit.ly/1bOhWb0

What role does our sense of touch play in our lives? 

According to Johns Hopkins neurobiologist David Linden, it impacts a large range. Our health, relationships, romance, shopping purchases, and even language have all been shaped by our fingertips.

Think Science: 'Citizen Science'

Feb 10, 2015
Courtesy of Jason St. Sauver

Did you know you can help scientists analyze the nesting habits of penguins by looking at online photos? Or that your computer can help search for intelligent life on other planets? With the help of "Citizen Scientists" just like you, researchers are able to crowd-source data collection. From harnessing the power of interconnected computers to mass bird and butterfly counts, Citizen Scientists work as individuals or in teams to provide researchers with the vast amounts of data needed for today's scientific studies.

New Lunchtime Panel Series, "Think Science" Opens Nov. 21

Nov 10, 2014

Mention the word “Ebola” and it brings to mind images of quarantines, fever, and hazmat suits. But how much do we have to worry about a widespread outbreak of the deadly disease? And is there an even greater danger lurking that we’ve caused ourselves through overuse of antibiotics? They’re questions on the minds of many thinking folks, and we’ll get some answers from the experts this month as Texas Public Radio opens a new lunchtime lecture and panel series, “Think Science.” 

Allan Ajifo http://bit.ly/1pr45xg / cc

The 2014 World Cup raised the hopes of the disabled and redefined how people look at technology when a paraplegic man named Juliano Pinto, who is completely paralysed from the lower torso down, used a mind-controlled robotic exoskeleton to perfrom the ceremonial first kick.

That robotic suit, which caught the world's attntion at Sao Paulo's Corinthians Arena in June, may end up redefining how we think about humanity.

Powell K: Economy of the Mind. PLoS Biol 1/3/2003: e77. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0000077
courtesy of Frans de Waa / cc

Some of the strategies that have led to your bad financial decisions are 35 million-years-old, argued Laurie Santos in her Ted Talk on deciphering risk and decision-making in primates.

Not only that, but she said that it may be impossible for all of humanity's improvements and advancements to escape the programmed biases of our primate ancestors. 

Pages