Mexico | Texas Public Radio

Mexico

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Verónica G. Cárdenas for Texas Public Radio

More than 30,000 asylum seeking migrants have been returned to Mexico to await their day in immigration court — a process that can take months. This is part of the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico policy. The program says vulnerable populations may be excluded from the program, but many migrants who are considered vulnerable populations, including LGBTQ asylum seekers, are still being sent back to Mexico.


Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Tens of thousands of migrants are in limbo in Mexican border towns because of the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico policy. The migrants wait for months in sometimes-dangerous conditions before they may appear in a U.S. immigration court. So some volunteers decided to transform a problem into an opportunity. They opened a special school for migrant children in Matamoros so that the kids' education could continue.

One day last week in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, a fearsome gun battle broke out on the main boulevard to the airport, as drivers careened off the thoroughfare in terror while rival narcos blasted away at each other.

The Cartel of the Northeast operates with impunity here, cruising around town in armored, olive-drab pickups with Tropas del Infierno, Spanish for "Soldiers from Hell," emblazoned on the doors.

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

Texans in border communities used to cross back and forth freely with little to no documentation

Much has changed since the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. The 9/11 Commission in 2004 determined the border crossing rules were too lax, and Congress passed the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, which required U.S. border crossers to possess passports or passport cards to cross the international ports of entry. Mexican travelers are required to carry a Border Crossing Card.

The complexities of international travel can be mind-twisting to someone who is new to it.


Veronica G. Cardenas for Texas Public Radio

A former U.S. ambassador to Mexico warned that the recent drama over tariffs on Mexican products may not be over. He's worried it may resume in three months.

President Donald Trump's threat to impose tariffs on Mexico was designed to pressure America’s top trading partner into taking action to prevent Central American immigrants from reaching the southern U.S. border.

The tariffs were scheduled to take effect on Monday, June 10. But on the previous Friday, Trump tweeted that Mexican officials “agreed to take strong measures to stem the tide of migration.”

The political and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela has led many Venezuelans to seek safe haven in the U.S. and Mexico. While the Trump administration is strongly pushing for a change of government in Venezuela, Mexico has decided to stay neutral.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

A new study shows what the climate will be like for major Texas cities in 2080. Bottom line: It will be warmer and drier for most Texans.

When Michelle Fenner signed up to run this year's Los Angeles Marathon, it got her thinking: Tijuana, Mexico, is only a 2 1/2-hour drive from LA. Why not take a trip across the border and buy some insulin for her son?

"It's so easy to just go across the border," Fenner mused.

Mexican archaeologists have discovered what they say is the first temple of a pre-Hispanic fertility god known as the Flayed Lord who is depicted as a skinned human corpse.

The discovery is being hailed as significant by authorities at Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History because it is a whole temple, not merely depictions of the deity, which have been found in other cultures.

Experts found two skull-like stone carvings and a stone trunk depicting the god Xipe Totec.

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