Mexico | Texas Public Radio

Mexico

Mexico's president is gearing up for a national raffle. The prize? The presidential plane. It's like Mexico's Air Force One, but the president refuses to step foot in it.

The plane, a Boeing 787 Dreamliner, has long been a symbol of government excess in the eyes of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador. He loves to rail on what he calls Mexico's corrupt political class, especially by pointing to the plane and those who bought and used it.

The last two weeks have been busy for Mexico's immigration authorities. Since Jan. 18, the Mexican government says it has "assisted returns" of 2,303 Central American migrants back to their home countries.

"Assisted returns" means deported — but much of the official language referring to migration in Mexico remains euphemistic, critics say, even as the government's migration policies have grown harsher.

From Texas Standard:

The Rio Grande, or the Rio Bravo as it's known south of the border, is a natural divider between the United States and Mexico. It's also an important shared natural resource. But a recent investigation by the nonprofit journalism organization Mexicanos Contra la Corrupción y la Impunidad found that some in Mexico might not be using that and other water resources the way they were intended.

Officials with the Texas Department of State Health Services is warning people not to buy cosmetics from outside of the U.S.
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A Texas woman spent 10 days in the hospital after using a face cream she bought in Mexico. The cream was a mixture of a brand-name product and a large amount of mercury. 

Carson Frame | Texas Public Radio

The Tamaulipas Attorney General's Office confirmed the identity of the asylum seeker who died by suicide on the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge.

Mexico and Canada are Texas’ biggest trading partners, accounting for $230 billion in 2018. After more than a year of talks, a new trade deal between the two countries and the United States could soon go into effect, pending Senate approval.


Paul Theroux is a novelist and also internationally renowned for his many books about travel.  He has spent more than 50 years traveling the globe to chronicle the lives of people in distant lands.  This time, he turns his eye on Mexico. 


From Texas Standard:

As GPS is used more and more to help us get where we’re going, a new exhibit at Sul Ross State University’s Museum of the Big Bend in Alpine is making a case for why maps still matter. 

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Verónica G. Cárdenas for Texas Public Radio

More than 30,000 asylum seeking migrants have been returned to Mexico to await their day in immigration court — a process that can take months. This is part of the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico policy. The program says vulnerable populations may be excluded from the program, but many migrants who are considered vulnerable populations, including LGBTQ asylum seekers, are still being sent back to Mexico.


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