marijuana reform | Texas Public Radio

marijuana reform

Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

The Bexar County Commissioners Court has authorized the purchase of equipment that will help crime labs differentiate between legal hemp and marijuana. 

The Texas Forensics Science Commission has worked with the federal Drug Enforcement Agency to come up with a new method of testing that could be available to prosecutors by early 2020.
Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

District attorneys throughout Texas haven’t prosecuted low-level marijuana offenses for the past few months because their forensic labs can’t tell the difference between legal hemp and marijuana.

Officials with the State of Texas, working with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, said it has found a solution. But at the recent Texas Marijuana Policy Conference in Austin, some prosecutors said they’re still not convinced to make possession charges a priority. 


Sundar1 / Wikimedia Commons

A record number of marijuana-related bills — 63 — were filed this legislative session. But only two bills made it across the finish line: the regulation of industrial hemp and the expansion of the state’s Compassionate Use Program.

Epileptic Council

The Texas House advanced a bill Monday that would expand the state’s medical marijuana program. The program, which is one of the most restrictive in the country, allows only patients with intractable epilepsy to be prescribed CBD oil with low levels of the psychoactive ingredient THC.

Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

Texas lawmakers overwhelmingly approved an effort to allow farmers to grow industrial hemp in the state.

John Boehner has been known to enjoy the occasional adult beverage. He famously nicknamed his negotiations over raising the nation's debt ceiling in 2011 the "Nicorettes and Merlot sessions." Nicorette because that's what President Obama would chew during the talks. Merlot because that was the drink of choice for the former speaker of the House.

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

Updated on March 7, 2019.

Texas leads the nation in arrests for possessing small amounts of marijuana. According to the most recent statistics available, there were 60,000 arrests in 2016 over possession of less than an ounce of the drug.

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, one of half a dozen Democratic senators running for the White House, is reintroducing a bill on Thursday that would fundamentally end the federal government's prohibition on marijuana.

Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

Groups pushing for an expansion of the state’s medical marijuana law joined people pushing decriminalization and total legalization efforts at the State Capitol on Thursday.  

The 400 people gathered in Austin comprised a colorful crowd of diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. But they all shared one objective: reform of the state’s current marijuana laws.

Heather Fazio, director of Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, said it has been a “banner year” for marijuana advocacy in Texas.

From Texas Standard:

Enforcing laws that make possession of small amounts of marijuana a criminal offense are costing taxpayers a lot of money, with little benefit in return. That’s the argument made by State Representative Jason Isaac (R-Dripping Springs). The bill he co-sponsored with Democrat Joe Moody of El Paso would reduce penalties for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana to a $250 civil fine.

Pages