Hurricane Harvey | Texas Public Radio

Hurricane Harvey

Credit National Weather Service

Continuing coverage of Hurricane Harvey, its effects on Texas, and the local, state, and national response to the storm.

Harvey made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane on Friday, August 25, 2017 near Rockport, Texas. It then moved inland, skirting San Antonio but causing major flooding in the Houston area.

From Texas Standard:

According to the latest predictions, Louisiana is likely to be hardest hit by a storm that could become a hurricane, if Tropical Storm Barry continues to gain strength. Luckily for Texas, the state likely won’t get much rain from that weather system. Nevertheless, it’s a good reminder for Texas to look at how well it’s prepared for the next major storm.

Carson Frame / Texas Public Radio

Updated at 5:23 p.m.

City Council approved an agreement with Joint Base San Antonio on Thursday to provide better coordination during a civil emergency or disaster. 


Hurricanes are dropping more rain and causing more flooding than in the past, and humans are to blame on multiple fronts.

Climate scientists have warned for decades that global warming will cause extreme weather to get more frequent and severe. A pair of studies published today in the journal Nature find that hurricanes are already causing more rain than they used to, and that cities themselves may be making the rainfall from those storms even worse.

Ryan E. Poppe

Hurricanes were on the minds of state lawmakers on Tuesday, but they weren't thinking about the ones in the Atlantic. The Senate Finance Committee explored Texas school districts damaged by Hurricane Harvey and what steps to take to help a district rebuild after a storm passes.


The Houston Ship Channel has the rhythm of an ant colony. Barges and oil tankers lumber through the silty water, tangles of exposed pipe rise hundreds of feet above a sea of white tanks. Residents of the coastal plain between Houston and Galveston will tell you the plain is flatter than a regulation pool table. But if you can get up high enough you'll see trains and ships and trucks moving ceaselessly from dock to dock, terminal to terminal.

How Hurricane Harvey Harmed The Clocks

Aug 26, 2018

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It has been a year since Hurricane Harvey hit Texas’ Gulf Coast, bringing heavy rains and widespread flooding.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson checks in with KUT reporter Jimmy Maas (@maasdinero), who has been speaking with victims of the storm to see how they’re doing today.

From Texas Standard:

Editor's Note: An earlier version of this story stated that the Rebuild Texas Fund reported the amount of recovery money Nueces County, where Port Aransas is located, has received. The reporting agency is called the Governor’s Commission to Rebuild Texas.

City leaders say Hurricane Harvey damaged 100 percent of Port Aransas' businesses and 85 percent of the beach community's homes.

From Texas Standard:

Up and down the Gulf Coast, Texans are still trying to get back to where they were before Hurricane Harvey hit. Some have had to rebuild from the ground up. For others, the trouble is with the ground itself.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Hurricane Harvey was followed by a massive release of highly toxic chemicals in the coastal area. Ilan Levin, Texas Director of the Environmental Integrity Project, joins us to discuss how better to prepare for future disasters.

Then, Texas Observer environment reporter Naveena Sadasivam (14:46) will talk about a nine-part series called "Shallow Watters," which looks at the impact of global warming on the Rio Grande River.


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