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Hitting developmental milestones is crucial for a child's educational success. Missing certain markers can indicate a learning disability, which has the power to significantly impede a person's reading, writing, speaking and math skills. 


Wikipedia Commons

Salma Paredes, a senior at Arlington Collegiate High School, enjoys graphic design, watching documentaries and hanging out with friends — when she has the time. She’s typically busy taking college courses and planning her future. She will graduate from high school this spring with 60 college credits, the equivalent of an associate’s degree, or half of a bachelor’s degree.

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As many as one-third of high-school graduates apply to college, are accepted and plan to enroll, but don't end up in class or enrolled in a post-secondary education program.

This so called "summer melt" phenomenon is attributed to various challenges and a lack of continued support, and is more common for students from lower-economic households and those who are the first in their family to attend college.

From Texas Standard.

On a recent chilly Friday night at Fort Davis ISD’s football field, the stands are nearly empty. No more than a half-dozen parents sat in the visitors section at the rural west Texas school to cheer their team: the El Paso Christian Home School Panthers.

Courtesy MOVE San Antonio

A state voter registration law enacted 34 years ago by the Texas legislature is seeing scant results, largely due to low participation by the same institutions the policy aims to target: high schools.    

The little-known law addresses voter registration for eligible students – teens at least 17 years and 10 months old – and requires Texas high school principals or designees to provide voter registration information at least twice a year.

According to the Texas Civil Rights Project, six percent of high schools asked the Texas Secretary of State's office for voter registration applications in 2016. Only 198 of the state's 1,428 public high schools indicated that they requested forms, while none of the estimated 1,800 private schools across the state reported making the same request.

"Participation in our High School Voter Registration Initiative is crucial to the future of our state and the health of our democracy," Secretary of State Rolando Pablos said in a statement. "I welcome any valid input from community stakeholders and seek to work with organizations whose priorities are educating students on their civic duties and empowering them to vote, rather than engaging in misplaced political campaigns."

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About 20 percent of teens have been diagnosed with one concussion, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association.

From Texas Standard:

Fridays mean high school football across most of Texas. And this time of year also means fall homecoming celebrations.


Thousands Of High School Students Getting Lost In Texas

Jun 7, 2015

The US high school graduation rate is at an all-time high. But why? NPR Ed partnered with 14 member stations around the country to bring you the stories behind that number. Check out the whole story here. And find out what's happening in your state. And find out what's happening in your state.

Source: http://mhs.harlandale.net/

SAN ANTONIO — Ten high school students in San Antonio could face prosecution after a cafeteria food fight left a cleanup worker seriously hurt.

KSAT-TV reports Thursday afternoon's incident happened at McCollum High School.

A spokeswoman for the Harlandale Independent School District says an employee who was cleaning up the mess slipped and fell. A statement says the worker, whose name wasn’t released, was hospitalized in serious condition.

Source: http://www.eastsidememorialhs.org

AUSTIN — More than a dozen students at an Austin high school have been charged with misdemeanor rioting for a brawl last month.

Cell phone videos showed no teachers or school administrators present as the students at Eastside Memorial High School were throwing punches and cafeteria chairs at each other.

School district Police Chief Eric Mendez told The Austin American-Statesman that “quite a bit of chaos” broke out April 9 in the apparent continuation of a fight after school the previous day.

He says teachers were in training sessions at the time and a security guard and school official were responding to another incident elsewhere on the campus.

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