electric scooters | Texas Public Radio

electric scooters

From Texas Standard:

If they're in your city, you've certainly seen them, and you've probably formed an opinion about electric scooters – personal transportation devices that are ubiquitous in most urban Texas areas. (Though Houston has been more resistant.) 

Many, mainly younger people, have flocked to the fleet of scooters from companies like Bird, Uber, Lyft and Lime. Scooter boosters say the vehicles – easily available, unlockable via apps and priced by the minute – are an inexpensive and eco-friendly way to get around a city's urban core. 

Their detractors point to an uptick in visits to hospital emergency rooms by riders and innocent bystanders, plus the obstruction of sidewalks, which is an especially tough issue for people with disabilities, to say little of the clutter along college drags from Austin to downtown Dallas to beachside Corpus Christi. 

San Antonians have taken 1.85 million rides on the city’s more than 14,000 scooters since the pilot program began six months ago. They’ve called 911 for scooter injuries more than 130 times in nearly the same time period.

The above map is based on data from the San Antonio Fire Department. They began collecting data on Sept. 25, 2018. It is current to June 10, 2019. They began tracking time of incident in the dataset in mid December.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio City Council has approved tighter rules for dockless vehicles like electric scooters throughout the city. They're in addition to an existing pilot program.

For the first time, researchers have been able to assess how dangerous electric scooters are.

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

Updated 8:45 p.m.

No new permits will be issued to electric scooter companies in San Antonio, as the City Council's transportation council Tuesday effectively ended the "light touch" phase of regulating scooters within city limits.