addiction | Texas Public Radio

addiction

Carson Frame / TPR News

The COVID-19 outbreak has strained the social supports and routines that help recovering addicts stay clean — and put new people at risk. As more cities and counties in Texas issue shelter-in-place orders to stop the spread, some in recovery are finding new ways to connect and maintain sobriety. 


Caffeine and sugar are two well-known ingredients in Coca-Cola — but many soda drinkers may not realize the fizzy beverage also contains salt.

But why add salt into a sugary drink? To make consumers thirsty and ready to buy more, says Dr. Robert Lustig, professor of pediatric endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco.

“They know what they’re doing. Do you have to put salt in Coke?” he says. “The fact is, you don’t have to put salt in soda. So this is by design.”

Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0 :http://bit.ly/2LEJOmo

As the government primarily focuses its efforts and resources on fighting the nation's ongoing opioid crisis, methamphetamine has reemerged as a growing threat to public health.


Pixabay CC0 http://bit.ly/2ndjy9Q

The Bexar County Opioid Implementation Task Force will begin drafting plans today to implement the state's first needle exchange program as part of a multifaceted effort to address the ongoing opioid crisis. 


Extreme Gaming Has A New Clinical Diagnosis

Jun 19, 2019
Pxhere CC0: http://bit.ly/2KlxFlR

Many people use video games as an escape – a chance to have fun, unwind and sidestep reality, but when does this pastime become a problem? Should excessive gaming be considered a health issue? The World Health Organization says yes.


Jr de Barbosa https://bit.ly/2ITXVoY

An expert on opioid use disorder in San Antonio is on a mission to get more Texas doctors qualified to prescribe a medication that has a high rate of success in treating opioid addiction but that too few doctors can legally prescribe.

TPR

For a quarter of a century, humans have been interacting online through the World Wide Web, and along with the easy access to information have been sea changes in the way we do business, converse, and even fall in love. What influence has the Internet had on the way our minds work? Have we become a nation of “skimmers” that can no longer find time to read a novel? What about the addictive nature of social media, gaming, gambling or even online pornography? How has the Internet changed us?

Growing up, neuroscientist Judith Grisel would take little sips of alcohol at family events, but it wasn't until she was 13 that she experienced being drunk for the first time. Everything changed.

"It was so complete and so profound," she says. "I suddenly felt less anxious, less insecure, less inept to cope with the world. Suddenly I was full and OK in a way that I had never been."

Grisel began chasing that feeling. Over the years, she struggled with alcohol, marijuana and cocaine. But along the way, she also became interested in the neuroscience of addiction.

Public Domain/Pixabay http://bit.ly/2Mr66KX

Flickr/USDA (Public Domain) http://bit.ly/2qALXEg

Overdose is now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States.


Pages