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addiction

Extreme Gaming Has A New Clinical Diagnosis

Jun 19, 2019
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Many people use video games as an escape – a chance to have fun, unwind and sidestep reality, but when does this pastime become a problem? Should excessive gaming be considered a health issue? The World Health Organization says yes.


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An expert on opioid use disorder in San Antonio is on a mission to get more Texas doctors qualified to prescribe a medication that has a high rate of success in treating opioid addiction but that too few doctors can legally prescribe.

TPR

For a quarter of a century, humans have been interacting online through the World Wide Web, and along with the easy access to information have been sea changes in the way we do business, converse, and even fall in love. What influence has the Internet had on the way our minds work? Have we become a nation of “skimmers” that can no longer find time to read a novel? What about the addictive nature of social media, gaming, gambling or even online pornography? How has the Internet changed us?

Growing up, neuroscientist Judith Grisel would take little sips of alcohol at family events, but it wasn't until she was 13 that she experienced being drunk for the first time. Everything changed.

"It was so complete and so profound," she says. "I suddenly felt less anxious, less insecure, less inept to cope with the world. Suddenly I was full and OK in a way that I had never been."

Grisel began chasing that feeling. Over the years, she struggled with alcohol, marijuana and cocaine. But along the way, she also became interested in the neuroscience of addiction.

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Overdose is now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States.


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Last month, about $48 million in alcoholic beverages were sold in Bexar County bars, restaurants and venues, according to the Texas comptroller's office.


David Martin Davies

“A down and out” – that’s the term police use for someone who is passed out in the street, typically from too much alcohol. Each day there are dozens of these “down and outs” that San Antonio police respond to.

Is 'Internet Addiction' Real?

May 18, 2017

When her youngest daughter, Naomi, was in middle school, Ellen watched the teen disappear behind a screen. Her once bubbly daughter went from hanging out with a few close friends after school to isolating herself in her room for hours at a time. (NPR has agreed to use only the pair's middle names, to protect the teen's medical privacy.)

"She started just lying there, not moving and just being on the phone," says Ellen. "I was at a loss about what to do."

In the field of addiction treatment, already brimming with intensely personal and emotional debates, there may be nothing more controversial than the role of 12-step programs, which are based on Alcoholics Anonymous.

At least 80 percent of current American addiction treatment— for both alcohol and other drugs — is based on teaching patients the ideology of the steps and persuading them to become members and attend meetings for the rest of their lives.

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