© 2020 Texas Public Radio
Real. Reliable. Texas Public Radio.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
News

U.S. Capitol Police Officer Killed In Attack At Capitol Checkpoint

U.S. Capitol Police officer William "Billy" Evans was killed Friday when a man attacked  him and another officer at a Capitol checkpoint. The other officer is being treated for injuries.
U.S. Capitol Police officer William "Billy" Evans was killed Friday when a man attacked him and another officer at a Capitol checkpoint. The other officer is being treated for injuries.

Two U.S. Capitol Police officers are injured after a car apparently rammed them at a barricade at the Capitol on Friday afternoon, Capitol Police said.

"USCP is responding to the North Barricade vehicle access point along [Constitution] Avenue for reports someone rammed a vehicle into two USCP officers," USCP said in a statement on Twitter. "A suspect is in custody. Both officers are injured. All three have been transported to the hospital."

Video from reporters at the scene posted on Twitter appeared to show a car that had crashed into a barrier. In the videos, at least two people were carried on stretchers into waiting ambulances.

The U.S. Capitol was placed under lockdown amid what Capitol Police described as "an external security threat."

No entry or exit is being permitted, and police said: "If you are outside, seek cover."

A statement from the Metropolitan Police Department, Washington, D.C.'s police force, said: "A call came in at approximately 1:05 pm to the unit block of Constitution Ave, NE, for the report of a possible shooting." MPD provided no other details.

The incidents comes less than three months after the Jan. 6 riot that exposed serious flaws in the Capitol's security apparatus.

This is a developing story. Some facts reported by the media may later turn out to be wrong. We will focus on reports from police officials and other authorities, credible news outlets and reporters who are at the scene. We will update as the situation develops.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.