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Government/Politics

Low Voter Turnout Expected Despite Significant Races In Texas Runoff Election

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Ryan Poppe

Historically, Texans just don’t vote in large percentages when comes to primary runoff elections, and even though there are still some key undecided primary elections, only the most politically engaged Texans are likely to cast a vote Tuesday.

Let’s put it this way: If people who vote in a primary election are the concentrated orange juice of the electorate, then those who vote during a primary runoff election are the pulp of that same orange juice.

RELATED | What You Need To Know To Vote In Primary Runoff Election

That citrusy ultra-commitment from voters is exactly what the Republican and Democratic parties are counting on.

Brandon Rottinhaus, political science professor at the University of Houston, said there is a real push from both parties to claim as many congressional seats as possible in November, especially open congressional seats like District 21 or battleground districts like District 23, both with anchors in San Antonio.

“It is a once in a generation opportunity for Democrats to take a clean strike at the Republican hold on a conservative Texas,” Rottinhaus said.

Republican voters will also need to decide who represents them in these same congressional districts.

Rottinhaus said Democratic primary voters will also decide if it will be former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez or Andrew White, the son of the late former -Gov. Mark White,  facing Republican Gov. Greg Abbott in November.

Voters in Bexar County will also decide on county judges, county commissioners and several other races.

Ryan Poppe can be reached at rpoppe@tpr.org or on Twitter @RyanPoppe1