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Environment

Zebra Mussels Take Over Another Texas Lake

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Texas Parks and Wildlife
zebra mussels

State officials are again reminding Texas boaters to clean their boats before leaving a waterway to help cut down on the spread of zebra mussels, following the infestation in yet another Texas lake. 
 
Texas Parks and Wildlife officials reported Friday that the Stillhouse Hollow Reservoir near Belton in Central Texas has become infested with the invasive species. Survey sites throughout the reservoir all were documented on July 25 with zebra mussels infestations.

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Credit Texas Parks and Wildlife
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Texas Parks and Wildlife
zebra mussels

The rapidly-producing mussels can clog public water-intake pipes, harm boats and motors, cover anything left under water, and litter beaches with their sharp shells. Since zebra mussels were first found in Texas in 2009, seven lakes in three river basins are now fully infested, meaning that they have an established, reproducing population. 

Boaters can help control the spread of zebra mussels by thoroughly cleaning, draining and drying their boats, motors and onboard receptacles as they exit waterways - before leaving for the highway to return home or to another lake. Zebra mussel larvae are microscopic and can survive for days in water transported from a lake. 

In Texas, it is unlawful to possess or transport zebra mussels, dead or alive. 

The rapidly-producing mussels can clog public water-intake pipes, harm boats and motors, cover anything left under water, and litter beaches with their sharp shells. Since zebra mussels were first found in Texas in 2009, seven lakes in three river basins are now fully infested, meaning that they have an established, reproducing population. 

 

Boaters can help control the spread of zebra mussels by thoroughly cleaning, draining and drying their boats, motors and onboard receptacles as they exit waterways - before leaving for the highway to return home or to another lake. Zebra mussel larvae are microscopic and can survive for days in water transported from a lake. 

 

In Texas, it is unlawful to possess or transport zebra mussels, dead or alive.