Joey Palacios

News Reporter

Born and raised in San Antonio, Joey joined the Texas Public Radio newsroom in October of 2011. Joey graduated from Roosevelt High School and obtained an A.A.S in Radio-Television-Broadcasting from San Antonio College in 2010.

Joey started his broadcasting career  in 2007 at KSYM-90.1 FM as a DJ and later became Program Director of the station. After graduation, he interned at  KTSA-550 AM and was hired as a reporter covering elections, breaking news, and the 2011 legislative session.

For TPR, Joey covers a variety of general assignments including: breaking news, local school districts, higher education, police, fire, capital improvement, non-profits, health care, community issues and local politics. Joey has also had several stories aired on NPR national newscasts.

When not working, Joey enjoys biking, hiking, cooking, and socializing.

Ways to Connect

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The Bexar County Sheriff’s Office announced Monday it has created a team of community liaisons to establish working relationships with culturally diverse communities.

 

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio Professional Firefighters Association faces a lawsuit from a new political action committee over how the fire union paid to gather signatures for its San Antonio First campaign.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Updated at 5:45 p.m.

The proposed budget for San Antonio is reaching its highest amount yet, at $2.8 billion — about $157 million above last year. City Manager Sheryl Sculley will present her budget to the City Council Thursday morning.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The issue of paid sick leave for workers in San Antonio has crossed an important threshold. Over 70,000 required signatures from petitions were certified by the San Antonio City Council Thursday.

 


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio Professional Firefighters Association is filing a federal lawsuit against the city over its “free speech areas” at city libraries. The union claims the city violated the First Amendment when it prevented union petitioners from entering the buildings.


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