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Water

Photo by Michael Stravato / The Texas Tribune

The Texas Supreme Court on Friday handed a victory to farmers, ranchers and other longstanding water rights holders by declining to take up a Brazos River case with widespread implications for future water battles in drought-prone Texas.

Nathan Cone / TPR

Whether the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer can meet the needs of a growing population in Texas was the question of the night at the Texas Water Symposium held on February 11, 2016 on the Texas State University campus in San Marcos. Texas State’s Geography Department, the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, and the Hill Country Alliance brought a group of aquifer scientists together to explore the topic.

In September of last year, a Flint pediatrician released stark findings about her city: The percentage of children age 5 and under with elevated levels of lead in their blood had nearly doubled since the city switched its water source a year and a half earlier.

The superintendent of Flint Community Schools, Bilal Tawwab, was listening. Even small amounts of lead can affect children's behavior and intelligence over time. With that in mind, he decided to keep the city's water out of his schools.

High levels of lead in their drinking water have Flint, Mich., residents relying on cases of bottled water for just about everything. So it may come as no surprise that thousands of them have stopped paying their water bills.

Lynna Kaucheck of the not-for-profit group Food and Water Watch delivered 21,000 signatures to the Flint mayor's office last week calling for a moratorium on drinking water bills.

"All of this is a lot for people to handle, and enough is enough," she said. "Flint residents need relief."

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

Beginning News Year’s Day, the cost of water will be going up for the average San Antonio Water Systems (SAWS) customer.

Last month San Antonio council members approved changes in water and sewer rates to help pay for new water supplies and to replace aging infrastructure.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

San Antonio Water System customers will face new water and sewer rates this January after the City Council passed a series of increases this afternoon.

Council members debated the issue for more than 4 hours  before voting 10-0 in favor of the increases. District 6 Councilman Ray Lopez was absent from the vote.

The revenue from the increased rates will pay to replace aging sewer and water infrastructure and fund the controversial $3.4 billion Vista Ridge Pipeline that will pump water from Burleson and Milam counties. 

Nathan Cone / TPR

Water is intimately connected to the human experience. It weaves into and out of our individual and collective human lives. Precisely because it is so interwoven in our lives, water frequently becomes part of the most important narratives that we tell about ourselves and our human experience. Water is there at the moment of creation; it is there at the moment of devastation; and it is there as we navigate the more subtle moments of our lives.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

More than 100 protesters stormed the offices of the San Antonio mayor and City Council Tuesday.  They’re calling on elected officials to kill the proposed 142-mile Vista Ridge water pipeline.

The rally brought together rural landowners living over the Carrizo Aquifer in Burleson County and urban opponents who say it’s not worth the cost. 

 

SAWS

The San Antonio City Council will be voting on proposed changes to the San Antonio Water System rate structure on November 19th.

A much anticipated report on San Antonio’s water future released Thursday could have an impact on the vote. The report is a collaborative effort of the Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) and the Texas A&M Institute of Renewable Natural Resources (IRNR), both part of the Texas A&M University System.

It includes details on the proposed 142-mile long Vista Ridge water pipeline from Burleson County.

Nathan Cone / TPR

The San Antonio Clean Technology Forum held its sixth annual Water Forum at the Pearl Stable on Monday, October 26. The program focused on Texas’s quest for future water supplies, including discussion about new initiatives by San Antonio Water System (SAWS) such as the controversial Vista Ridge project, the launch of the new Texas A&M University San Antonio Water Institute, water quality issues, and major water projects funded by the Texas Water Development Board.

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