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The San Antonio Water System is stepping up enforcement since levels at the Edwards Aquifer test well triggered Stage 1 Watering Restrictions several weeks ago. 

Jeff Turner (CC BY 2.0) / Flickr http://bit.ly/2tozgMx

What is the future of water in San Antonio?

As Stage 1 restrictions take effect, the San Antonio Water System is working to review the city's water management plan, which is updated periodically.

Caitlin Saks / WGBH

"Water. Turn on the faucet and it's always there. Without it we perish. But how safe is our tap water?"

Using Flint, Michigan, as a case study, a new documentary focuses in on vulnerabilities in water systems across the U.S. Lead began seeping into the drinking water when the city switched its supply in 2014, causing a massive public health crisis.

More people in Texas drink from water systems that are in violation of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act than any other state in the country,  according to a new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council.

From Texas Standard:

The risks of lead poisoning are well-known. Exposure to lead can cause brain damage and behavioral disorders, as well as other ailments like kidney failure. Lead exposure is particularly dangerous for children.

Places like Flint, Michigan have grabbed headlines for catastrophic levels of lead exposure. But it's a problem in central Texas, too. Using data from the Texas Department of State Health Services, the Waco Tribune-Herald found that nearly six percent of children in the area who were tested had elevated levels of lead in their blood – nearly double the state average.

 

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

UTSA physicist Kelly Nash is shooting a laser into a vessel filled with metal pellets to create a nanomaterial in a water solution.  It's a building block of what she and colleague Heather Shipley hope could dramatically reduce size, scope and environmental impact of water cleaning technology. 

Paul Huchton Photography / http://paulhuchtonphotography.com

“God just gave us so much water. We can't make it, it's just there. But we’re making more people.” Such as it was plainly stated by Mike Bira at the latest Texas Water Symposium, held on February 23, 2017 on the campus of Texas State University in San Marcos. The panel discussion focused on watershed protection programs at a city and community level.

CC0 Public Domain http://bit.ly/2lsqOsY

As the state legislative session rolls on, water is never far off the agenda. State Representative Lyle Larson from San Antonio says water will be his priority as acting chair of the Texas House Natural Resources Committee.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio Water System officially opened on Friday its desalination plant that will pull water from the salty Wilcox Aquifer. It’s one of the largest inland desalination plants in the country.

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