Water | Texas Public Radio

Water

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

“We take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude,” Dr. Tom Arsuffi stressed near the beginning of the most recent Texas Water Symposium. The panel discussion, moderated by Katherine Romans, Executive Director of the Hill Country Alliance, also brought together District 53 Rep. Andy Murr and Texas A&M researcher Hughes Simpson to discuss the preservation of natural assets.

Bob Nichols, USDA. Public domain / USGS

They tell you in Texas, "don’t curse those rainy days" because you never know when the rain will stop — and stop and stop.

On this episode of "Texas Matters," we talk to Seamus McGraw about his new book, “A Thirsty Land: The Making of an American Water Crisis” and what Texans can look forward to as the population grows and the state's water supply dries up.


From Texas Standard:

The Rio Grande isn't as full as it used to be. And that's a problem for everyone who shares the river. Texas claims that New Mexico is keeping more than its fair share of the water. And it's actually suing that state and Colorado in a case that's gone to the Supreme Court.

But the Rio Grande doesn't just flow through the U.S. It also feeds Mexico. Officials on both sides of the border are concerned about water scarcity, and they are taking new measures to conserve the resource.

Springs Of South Central Texas

Mar 15, 2018
David Martin Davies

Springs of South Central Texas: Gregg Eckhardt is an environmental scientist with 29 years of experience in environmental modeling and analysis, water resource planning and development, state and federal permitting, and water treatment. He is known as "The Nerd King of South Texas Water History." In this lecture recorded on March 10 for Headwaters at Incarnate Word, he describes San Antonio's colorful water history and the importance of Edwards Aquifer springs to the region's cultural and economic development.

State of Louisiana

Many drought-stricken Texas cities have long searched for alternative sources of water, including asking neighboring states for help.  Now, Louisiana has approved a measure to begin studying that very idea.


From Texas Standard.

Much debris has been cleared out, but three months after Harvey’s landfall, the ecological damage is still being assessed. Not long after the storm clouds cleared, oyster and shrimp farmers lamented the hit to their livelihoods from extensive rains and runoff.

But researchers at the University of Houston at Clear Lake have been looking at the storm’s effect on other marine life, too – and they’ve discovered that bottlenose dolphins, have developed some puzzling ailments after the storm. Kristi Fazioli, a research associate with the Environmental Institute of Houston at the University of Houston Clear Lake, helps study this population.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

The state’s expanding population, coupled with more extreme flooding events and drought cycles, is creating short-term management challenges and long-term planning uncertainty. We rely on prevailing climate patterns to plan for development, agriculture, and ranching, but those patterns are changing.

Water quality was at the top of everyone’s mind at the eighth annual Water Forum sponsored by San Antonio Clean Technology Forum. Even before opening the program, several speakers cited the quality of San Antonio’s water. Andrew Sansom, who was awarded the Water for Life award for his work with the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, among other achievements, noted in accepting the award, “San Antonio is a beacon of hope for the rest of the United States with respect to water.”

From Texas Standard:

It’s clean-up time at the home where Ron Gertson is staying. He’s taking refuge at his brother’s house because his house is uninhabitable at the moment. It is full of flood water from Hurricane Harvey.

Wikimedia Commons

San Antonio entered Stage 1 water restrictions on July 14th. That's the first water rationing to occur in two years. But this morning's heavy rains and thunderstorms may help delay the onset of Stage 2. 

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