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As the nation tries to determine the facts behind an alleged sexual assault involving Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, many people are pointing out that these types of assaults are common.


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Washington Post opinion writer Elizabeth Bruenig writes about an accusation of rape that happened in her high school in Arlington in 2006 (:38). Then, Susanna Pringle, legal director of the Texas Fair Defense Project, talks about bail reform in Texas (19:12). And finally, Gary Scout wrote a job ad encouraging "whiners" need not apply (23:20).


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Julissa Arce graduated at the top of her high school class in San Antonio and went on to succeed in college, before becoming a star of Wall Street. Arce was vice president for Goldman Sachs by the time she was 27 years old — all this while also being an undocumented immigrant living in fear of being deported. She spoke to Texas Public Radio contributor Yvette Benavides.


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Indian tribes with possible ties to Frio County around 1,000 years ago are being contacted by state officials to determine what to do with the remains of a Native American found under a bridge, according to the Anthropology Center at Texas State University in San Marcos.

 


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A federal judge recently blocked a Texas law requiring the burial or cremation of fetal tissue resulting from an abortion or miscarriage.

Jonathan Saenz, an attorney for Texas Values, is an advocate for tough anti-abortion laws. Molly Duane, an attorney for the Center for Reproductive Rights, sued Texas over the legality of the fetal tissue law. They join us on this episode of Texas Matters.


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On the southern tip of Texas, Cameron County is bordered by the Gulf of Mexico to the east and Mexico to the west. It ranks in the bottom 10 percent of the state in terms of overall health factors, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

To counter these health risks, and to spur activity and tourism, a coalition of 11 communities in Cameron County is developing the Lower Rio Grande Valley Active Plan that will link the communities with 428 miles of on-and-off street hike-and-bike and water trails.


David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Some Hispanic-Americans, born in the U.S., who have applied for an American passport have been accused of fraud and are being jailed in immigration detention centers. Andre Segura, the legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, joins Texas Matters to discuss the issue. Also, paid sick leave is at the center of debate in Texas (14:40).


A jury in Texas sentenced former police officer Roy Oliver to 15 years in prison for the murder last year of an unarmed black teenager.

Oliver was a police officer in the Dallas suburb of Balch Springs when the shooting took place in April of last year. He and his partner responded to reports of underage drinking. Oliver fired his weapon five times at a moving vehicle. Jordan Edwards, 15, in the front passenger seat, was shot in the head and killed.

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Will an ambitious $12 billion project called the Texas Spine protect the Gulf Coast from future hurricane storm surges and who will pay for it? We'll hear from Len Waterworth, a retired coloniel in the Army Corp of Engineers, and Brandt Mannchen, with the Sierra Club.  Then, Texas turtle meat is now off the menu in Asia now that the shell-shocked reptile is protected (17:41). And can Bitcoin make it rain money again in Rockdale? (22:41).


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Hurricane Harvey was followed by a massive release of highly toxic chemicals in the coastal area. Ilan Levin, Texas Director of the Environmental Integrity Project, joins us to discuss how better to prepare for future disasters.

Then, Texas Observer environment reporter Naveena Sadasivam (14:46) will talk about a nine-part series called "Shallow Watters," which looks at the impact of global warming on the Rio Grande River.


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