Poverty | Texas Public Radio

Poverty

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San Antonio often ranks as one of the most racially integrated cities overall, but a recent report finds the city's black and Hispanic communities are disproportionately affected by poverty – especially in four specific zip codes.


Murals near the Inner City Development Center in the 78207 zip code on San Antonio's West Side. It's one of four zip codes highlighted for illustrating the city's economic inequality.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Many black and Latino families continue to have less access to wealth and opportunity in San Antonio, especially when they live in racially and economically segregated parts of the city.

That’s according to a new report produced by research and advocacy group Texas Appleseed.

In early April, Governor Greg Abbott, Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick and Speaker Dennis Bonnen announced that they will support a proposal to raise the sales tax in Texas and use those proceeds to cut property taxes.

From Texas Standard:

In the United States, over 10 million children live below the federal poverty line, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It's the lowest child poverty rate in decades, but researchers and public policy experts are determined to bring down that number even further.

In a recently published report called "A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty" from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, its co-authors suggest policy changes that they claim could cut child poverty in half in just 10 years.

Cynthia Osborne contributed to the report. She's associate dean and director of the Center for Health and Social Policy at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. Osborne says the irony of child poverty is that it's expensive.

University of Texas Press

The Texas Legislature established the Waco State Home as the State Home for Dependent and Neglected Children in 1919. It closed in 1979. Anglo children adjudged by district courts to be neglected were declared wards of the state of Texas, and they were admitted to the home for care, education and training.

For many years, what happened inside the walls of the Waco State Home was only whispered about. Frequently, there was harsh treatment of the children — brutal beatings and sexual abuse.

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It costs about $5,000 a month to maintain a family of four in Bexar County. New findings published by the United Ways Of Texas identified about 500,000 local households in the "in-between," earning above the federal poverty standards but below the amount needed for basic living costs.


San Antonio College moved its student resource center into its own building in the fall of 2018.  It was previously housed in a couple of  classrooms.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

In 2016, San Antonio College started a program to meet the needs of students living in poverty.

Since then, the Student Advocacy Center has helped hundreds of students through financial emergencies and family crises, with the goal of keeping them on track to complete a degree.


CBS News

It was 50 years ago that a documentary exposed the conditions on the San Antonio Westside that shocked the nation.

America saw disturbing images of extreme poverty and malnutrition that was common in San Antonio.

Half a century later the CBS program “Hunger in America” continues to resonate in San Antonio.

 


The Texas Tribune

On this episode of "Texas Matters," this is one of 19 states to not expand Medicaid when the Affordable Care Act became law. Matthew Buettgens, lead author of the report “The Implications of Medicaid Expansion in the Remaining States,” joins us to discuss whether or not Medicaid expansion is good for the Lone Star state. Also, author Ken Roberts talks about a tight society of fiercely independent country folk – known as "The Cedar Choppers (10:30)."


DANIEL SALINAS / LAS CRUCES HIGH SCHOOL

On this episode of Texas Matters:

  • Cash bail in Texas is called unconstitutional (:52)
  • Charges of corruption in construction of the border fence (7: 00)
  • DACA recipients oppose deal on border wall (15:38)
  • Border Colonia residents live in extreme poverty (20:46)


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