mental health | Texas Public Radio

mental health

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Living with a mental illness can be a confusing and fear-inducing experience. For many, the stigma surrounding mental illness prevents individuals from seeking professional help or long-term solutions.


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Josie Méndez-Negrete is a sociologist and associate professor of Mexican American studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Her adult son, Robert Lopez, 47, is schizophrenic.
Her 2015 book, “A Life on Hold: Living with Schizophrenia,” recounts their efforts to cope and live with mental illness.


From Texas Standard:

A 2014 Department of State Health Services report found almost three-quarters of Texas counties had no psychiatrists at all. That means Texans seeking mental health in these mostly rural areas often have to drive hours to an appointment – if they can get one at all. But a new program in Midland could offer at least a partial fix.

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People in the United States say they're more anxious this year than in 2017, according to The American Psychiatric Association's latest public opinion poll


David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Nonprofit organizations continue to provide mental health services to Texas coastal residents struggling with anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and depression related to Hurricane Harvey.  


School counselors teach students coping methods and help them work through their emotions and behavior.
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For every public school counselor in Texas last school year, there were almost 450 students.

The American School Counselor Association recommends a ratio of 250 to one.

The Veterans Health Administration is planning to make mental health care more available to help reduce veteran suicide. But veterans advocates worry about the impact on the already strained VA health system.

From Texas Standard.

A 2014 report found that five of the 10 psychiatric hospitals in Texas were in such disrepair that they needed to be replaced. Lawmakers and state health officials have since been debating what to do about the aging facilities. One part of that debate has included perhaps relocating the hospital in Austin – the state’s oldest psychiatric hospital – and selling the valuable land.

The Texas Legislature approved $300 million last year to overhaul the hospitals, and the state Health and Human Services Commission announced yesterday that the first chunk of that money will be doled out to start the process.

This month’s mass shooting at a Texas church has raised questions of whether the military does enough to help former service members with bad conduct discharges. They're not eligible for veterans' mental health care.  

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