mental health | Texas Public Radio

mental health

Ryan E. Poppe

State lawmakers are studying how housing instability, homelessness and mental illness are interconnected and what changes might reduce the state’s overall homeless population.


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

A group of local police, emergency medical technicians, hospitals, homeless service groups and others are launching the Southwest Texas Crisis Collaborative.


Saulalbert/Flickr (CC BY 2.0) http://bit.ly/2Bi1dyD

Living with a mental illness can be a confusing and fear-inducing experience. For many, the stigma surrounding mental illness prevents individuals from seeking professional help or long-term solutions.


Alberto Ruggieri/Getty Images

Josie Méndez-Negrete is a sociologist and associate professor of Mexican American studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Her adult son, Robert Lopez, 47, is schizophrenic.
Her 2015 book, “A Life on Hold: Living with Schizophrenia,” recounts their efforts to cope and live with mental illness.


From Texas Standard:

A 2014 Department of State Health Services report found almost three-quarters of Texas counties had no psychiatrists at all. That means Texans seeking mental health in these mostly rural areas often have to drive hours to an appointment – if they can get one at all. But a new program in Midland could offer at least a partial fix.

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